Burn without concern: Research investigates fish mercury levels after…

Phys Org – The USDA Forest Service in the Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area (BWCWA) will continue to use controlled burns without worrying about fish health in associated watersheds, researchers say. "Fire is a part of this community," said soil scientist Randall Kolka of the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, one of the lead authors in the study. "By using it you can Read More…

Why the World’s Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters

Yale 360 – In September 2011, after 20 years of planning, workers began dismantling the Elwha and Glines dams on the Elwha River in northwestern Washington state. At the time, it was the largest dam removal project in U.S. history, and it took nearly three years for both barriers to be dismantled and for the river to once again flow freely. Over the course of their nearly century-long Read More…

Climate Change Is Shrinking the Colorado River

Newsdeeply – The nation’s two largest reservoirs, Lake Mead on the Arizona/Nevada border and Lake Powell on the Arizona/Utah border, were brim full in the year 2000. Four short years later, they had lost enough water to supply California its legally apportioned share of Colorado River water for more than five years. Now, 17 years later, they still have not recovered. This ongoing, Read More…

How Satellite Imagery Is Transforming Conservation Science

Yale 360 – As recently as the 1980s, gray seals were effectively extinct on Cape Cod. So when researchers announced last week that the population there has recovered not to 15,000 gray seals, the previous official estimate, but to as many as 50,000, it was dramatic evidence of how quickly conservation can sometimes work. But the researchers, writing in the journal BioScience, weren’t Read More…

This adorable baby turtle blob is bringing hope to Southeast Asia

Mashable – Hello, turtle friend. The months-old blob seen above is an Asian giant softshell turtle. Scientists long thought this species was extinct in the Cambodian portion of the Mekong River — until they discovered some stragglers in the early 2000s. Since then, conservation groups have worked with local communities and officials to boost the wild population of these endangered Read More…

The War on Southeast Asia’s Natural Environment

The Diplomat – The first and only time I have ever heard a tiger roar in the wild was in 2013 in eastern Thailand. I’ll never forget it. We were camped out in a half-demolished ranger substation that was missing its entire front wall and most of its windows; this was the handiwork of a herd of Asian elephants, apparently irritated by this manmade structure deep inside their forest home. A Read More…

Scary looking fish make new home at Feather River Fish Hatchery

KRCR 7 News – Lamphreys are an eel-like creature that have made a new home out of the Feather River Fish Hatchery. The lamphrey has always lived in the depths of the Feather River, but the Oroville Dam spillway crisis has made them more visible than they have been for decades. Jana Frazier, a tour guide with the Department of Water Resources, posted pictures of a lamphrey on Read More…

Columbia River shad run explodes in near-record burst over Bonneville…

The Spokesman-Review – Holy shad! Fish managers couldn't believe their eyes when they scanned the fish count numbers from Bonneville Dam this morning. "I had to call the COE fish count hotline message to confirm 497,738 shad were counted at Bonneville Dam yesterday," said Joe Hymer, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife salmon specialist in Vancouver. "It confirmed the count." The Read More…

Brown Bag Seminar: The Delta as Changing Landscapes

Maven's Notebook – Letitia Grenier is the principal investigator for the San Francisco Estuary Institute’s Delta Landscapes project, which recently completed an in-depth analysis on the change in the Delta overtime and is now offering science-based guidance on how the Delta’s ecosystem health can be recovered as part of a working landscape. Ms. Grenier is one of a number of authors on Read More…

NOAA: Two more groundfish species have recovered

Chinook Observer – A regional fishery management council has announced that two previously over-fished species on the West Coast have recovered ahead of schedule. For the first time in more than a decade, fishing restrictions will ease for bocaccio and darkblotched rockfish, both varieties of groundfish that have been under strict rebuilding plans for years. Harvest limits for both fish Read More…