Melting Snowpack Poses Dangers in the Sierra Nevada This Week

Weather – Snowpack melt will accelerate this week in the Sierra Nevada due to very warm temperatures. High flows and flooding on rivers and streams is a danger to campers in the Sierra region. Cold water temperatures could cause hypothermia in a short amount of time. The Sierra Nevada snowpack is melting quickly this week as very warm temperatures grip the region, raising the Read More…

Helicopter used to forecast saltwater intrusion in Santa Cruz County

Santa Cruz Sentinel – Emerging from the heavy fog with a staccato roar, a low-flying helicopter lowered a nearly 3,700-square-foot fiberglass frame onto Seascape Park Monday morning. Nearby resident Veronica Joyce-Gallart, out for a walk at the time, was surprised. “I wasn’t sure what it was from a distance,” Joyce-Gallart said. “My first thought was, what on earth is that? I Read More…

Climate Change Taking Toll on Clarity of Lake Tahoe Water

U.S. News & World Report – Climate change is causing Lake Tahoe to warm sooner in the spring than it has historically, disrupting the normal mixing of shallow and deep water and undercutting gains made in reversing the loss of clarity of the cobalt mountain lake, scientists say. "Climate change is impacting not only Lake Tahoe's water quality, but also the health of its Read More…

Sand mining kills rivers in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta

Viet Nam Net Bridge – A report of the Steering Committee for Climate Change Response, Disaster Prevention and Search and Rescue of Dong Thap Province showed that since early 2017, there have been 13 landslides in the province, sweeping away a total area of 5,924 square meters. In An Giang, severe landslides have occurred in many parts of the province this year. Notably, the sinking of a Read More…

Bad salmon run hints at trouble ahead

Daily Astorian – Count backward three years and we come to 2014 — precursor to this spring’s extremely poor salmon returns. Fewer than 45,000 adult spring Chinook and about 5,300 immature jacks have been counted at Bonneville Dam, compared to 10-year averages of about 135,000 and 21,000. Shad, another species that should begin surging toward inland spawning grounds about now, reached Read More…

Saving Idaho’s salmon: Nature again turns against returning fish…

The Idaho Statesman – Idaho’s salmon run this year is beginning to look bleak. Oregon and Washington officials shut down fishing season on the lower Columbia River earlier this month because so few spring chinook heading for spawning grounds in Idaho and other Snake River tributaries had shown up at the Bonneville Dam near Portland. Idaho’s Fish and Game Commission took a wait-and-see Read More…

Anglers put the bite on Columbia River bass

The Spokesman Review – Even with the Walla Walla River running high and milk-chocolate brown in mid-April, a couple of anglers casting crawdad jigs from a raft were hooking not-so-small smallmouth bass in the 2- to 4-pound range in nearly every significant pocket of soft, shallow shoreline water they could find. The river loads up with smallies that swim out of the Columbia to stage for Read More…

Summer steelhead fishing faces sharp restrictions on the Columbia…

The Oregonian – Oregon fish managers will host a public meeting Wednesday to get public opinion about how to cope with low summer steelhead runs in the Columbia River and its tributaries. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in the lower conference room of the department's regional office in Clackamas, 17330 SE Evelyn St. Drive through the gate and follow the driveway down to the lower-level Read More…

More juvenile fish die at Little Goose Dam

Tri-City Herald – More young fish have died at the Little Goose Dam juvenile fish bypass system because of debris swept into the unusually high waters of the Snake River this spring. The Army Corps said Friday that screens that act as barriers to protect fish in the bypass system of the dam were damaged by debris. Juvenile steelhead and salmon were trapped between the mesh of the screens Read More…

Washington Loses Fight, Might Pay Up To $2B To Save salmon

Columbia Basin Herald – Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration. A panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last year affirmed a lower court's 2013 ruling ordering the state to fix or replace hundreds of culverts — large pipes that allow streams to pass Read More…