Delta ecosystems under threat

Vietnam NetUncontrolled exploitation of natural resources has weakened or completely destroyed many of the Cuu Long (Mekong) Delta's ecosystems, experts said at an annual forum last Friday.More than 200 scientists, policymakers from ministries as well as officials of the 13 Delta provinces, representatives from international conservation and development organisations, research institutes and Read More…

Ocean acidification as a hearing aid for fish

Science BlogOcean acidification, which occurs as CO2 is absorbed by the world’s oceans, is known to negatively impact a wide variety of marine animals ranging from massive corals to microscopic plankton. However, there is much less information about how fish may be impacted by acidification, should carbon emissions continue to rise as a result of human activities.In a new study published in the Read More…

Study shows depleted fish stocks can come back from the brink

PhysOrgNature is a lot more resilient than we sometimes think. A study by Rutgers marine scientists published recently in Science shows that species of fish that have been overfished for decades can often be brought back more easily than expected once fisheries managers put limits on the exploitation.It turns out, in fact, that the resilience – the ability to recover from overfishing – of a Read More…

EPA slams California for not spending clean-water funds

The Sacramento BeeCalifornia on Friday was declared to be out of compliance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act because it is sitting on $455 million that should be spent to improve local drinking water systems.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency submitted the notice after years of fruitless efforts to get the state to document its spending under the program, said Jared Blumenfeld, Read More…

Dredge plans draws opposition

The San Francisco ChronicleCargo barges sail serenely between Portland, Ore., and Lewiston, Idaho, the most inland seaport on the West Coast.But rough waters may lie ahead, because some environmental activists oppose the federal government's latest plan to dredge a shipping channel on the lower Snake River. Dredging is necessary every few years to keep the channel in front of the Port of Lewiston Read More…

Several Oregon basins facing drought condition

The Columbia Basin BulletinThe Oregon water supply for the coming spring and summer is forecast to be near-normal for northwest Oregon and portions of northeast Oregon, and below-normal for much of southwest, central and eastern Oregon, especially south-central and southeast basins, according to the most recent “outlook” produced April 11 by the NOAA National Weather Service’s Portland Read More…

Some depleted stocks still can recover, others can not

FISA new study by Rutgers University shows that fish species that have been overfished for decades can be brought back to health more easily than originally thought, once limits are placed on fishing.Marine scientists reported that a fish stock’s ability to recover from overfishing is enhanced even if it has been moderately overexploited for decades, possibly allowing for a quick recovery if Read More…

Toothfish numbers declared sustainable

ABC NewsTasmania's toothfish fishery has been declared sustainable by two influential bodies following adjustments in fishing methods.Just 15 years ago the fishery was on the verge of being decimated by poachers in the Southern Ocean.In an unusual partnership, environmentalists and the industry campaigned together to encourage consumer boycotts as well as increased surveillance at sea and more Read More…

Bycatch a problem that just won’t go away for Southcentral Alaska…

Alaska DispatchIncidental harvest of thousands of Chinook salmon in Gulf of Alaska trawl fisheries is an issue that just won't go away, simmering before federal fisheries managers as debate continues over whether a catch share program would solve the problem.Final action on Gulf of Alaska king salmon bycatch in non-pollock trawl fisheries is scheduled for the June 3-11 meeting of the North Read More…

Massive amounts of charcoal from world’s wildfires end up in oceans

UPIMassive amounts of charcoal created when wildfires ravage the world's forests don't stay in the soil as thought but end up in oceans, researchers say.The charcoal residue created in such fires is eventually washed out of the soil of the forest floor and transported to the sea by rivers and thus enters Earth's carbon cycle.Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Read More…