Key wildlife refuge hit hard in Klamath Basin’s water wars

The OregonianNormally, the honks and calls of thousands of ducks, grebes and egrets clustering at the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge make it hard to talk over the racket.But conversation is easy this summer. The only sounds at the bird-watching deck come from trucks on the distant highway and a few twittering songbirds.The 54,000-acre refuge at the Oregon-California border hasn't had Read More…

Agencies to move forward with trout restoration

Tahoe Daily TribunePoisoning a creek to restore a fish population may sound like a bit of a contradiction, but that’s the plan on a remote section of Silver King Creek in Alpine County.The California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced they will move forward with a joint effort to restore Paiute cutthroat trout on an 11-mile Read More…

Cold water release from dam to cool lower Snake River

Tri-City HeraldPacific Northwest water managers are releasing a pulse of cold water from the Dworshak Reservoir earlier than usual in hopes of cooling water temperatures in the lower Snake River and improving conditions for salmon and steelhead.Each summer, managers release about 2 million acre-feet of 43-degree water from the reservoir to keep stretches of Snake River and its tributaries cool Read More…

Floating fish collector helps salmon, steelhead

WRALMark Ferraiolo gently grabbed the slightly anesthetized young salmon, identified its species, measured it, and returned it to the water at PacifiCorp's new $63-million fish collection facility on Swift Reservoir.After a tanker truck ride of a bit more than an hour, the little coho was released with 104 others in the lower Lewis River at Woodland, free to continue its journey via the Columbia Read More…

Scientists identify the sensor that tells fish when to spawn

The Asahi ShimbumResearchers say they have discovered for the first time the mechanism that enables fish to sense the seasons, but more importantly, tells them when it is time to spawn.A study of salmon found an area of the brain, that scientists had long known about, but were puzzled as to its purpose, which signals to fish the changes in the length of the day that come with the seasons, Read More…

Science answers life’s biggest questions: Do fish feel pain?

Carbonated TVNope!Fishing just got a whole lot less graphic as scientists declared today that fish lack the brain power necessary to feel pain. When a fish is hooked in the mouth via a lure, it’s thrashing and discontent is not caused by any sort of anguish, but instead by the fact that something keeps pulling its mouth away from its body.The study, published in in the journal Fish and Read More…

In fish brains, a clue to why we talk with our hands

POPSCIWe use hand gestures almost without thinking--even while talking on the phone, despite that the person on the other end can't see our wild gesticulations. Research presented today might help shed light on why we talk with our hands. Led by Andrew Bass of Cornell University, the study finds a link between sounds and gestures in an unlikely place: fish brains.Bass found that in fish, the part Read More…

Farmed fish may have different personality traits

FISScientists at Nofima Mat, the Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research have studied the individual behaviour of Atlantic cod in order to examine whether it is possible to breed a fish more adapted for a life in aquaculture and have found out that even when farmed fish look so similar they may have different “personality traits.”Nofima runs the National Cod Breeding Read More…

Use grasshoppers to grow fish

Homer TribuneAlaska spends more than $20 million on fish feed each year for its 35 salmon hatcheries — feed that comes primarily from anchovies caught in South America. Meanwhile, Alaska seafood processing companies produce more than 200,000 tons of fishmeal each year — for customers in Asia.Last year, 33 million fish — 20 percent of the total Alaska salmon harvest — originated in Read More…

Commercial catch exceeds 20 million salmon

The Cordova TimesStatewide commercial harvests of wild Alaska salmon rose to 20 million fish July 1, the bulk of them red, as the Bristol Bay catch reached a harvest of over 9 million salmon, the bulk of them sockeye.The preliminary statewide salmon harvest, which is updated daily during the season by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, included 14.7 million red, 4.1 million chum, more than a Read More…