The Future of Fish Is Farmed

Bloomberg – Farmed or wild? Local or imported? Organic? Or some certification you've never heard of? Anyone who has tried to be an eco-conscious seafood consumer—or seen headlines about plummeting wild fish stocks or antibiotic-laden seafood from farms in China—has faced these questions. There are many more. Take farms, whether inland or in the ocean. So much depends on the Read More…

Over USD 497,000 destined for fisheries and aquaculture research

FIS – The Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Fund (FIPA) has placed a total of five research projects within the Public Market portal, including an indicative budget of CLP 336 million (approximately USD 497,300). These projects cover a number of areas, such as the study of gaps presented by the process activity derived from the jumbo flying squid to reach international markets, and the Read More…

This May Be the Key to Sustainable Aquaculture

Organic Authority – Just a few years ago, it was taboo to buy farmed fish, but now, experts are saying aquaculture might actually be the only way to ensure sustainable seafood consumption. The key to this apparent paradox is in finding something sustainable to feed all those farmed fish. The misconceptions around the innate unsustainability of farmed fish began in the 1970s, according Read More…

Maggots dine on restaurant scraps before becoming fish food in…

ABC News – A West Australian company hopes to use hundreds of tonnes of food scraps to feed maggots, which will then be turned into a food source for farmed fish. Right now it takes about 1.5 kilograms of ocean-caught fish to produce 1kg of farmed fish. Substituting fish with maggot meal could be a sustainable solution for the growing aquaculture industry. Luke Wheat from Future Green Read More…

WWF email reveals concern over salmon industry’s ‘negative impact…

ABC News – An email from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) obtained by the ABC reveals concerns that Tasmania's salmon industry is having a "significant negative impact on the environment" despite the organisation being paid to endorse the environmental credentials of Australia's biggest producer, Tassal. The Australian branch of the WWF allows Tassal to use its logo on its products as an Read More…

NOAA intends to develop commercial sablefish farming

FIS – Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) intend to find ways to make it easier and more efficient to commercially harvest sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) as part of the federal agency's efforts for marine aquaculture to contribute to meet a growing demand worldwide for seafood. Sablefish, also known as black cod or butterfish, are a long-lived Read More…

Norwegians seek to export aquaculture technology to Vietnam

The Fish Site – Executives from 16 Norwegian aquaculture businesses have taken part in a workshop in Vietnam in order to promote how technology could help develop the sector’s potential. Organised by Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and the Norwegian Embassy, the event sought to introduce Norwegian technologies in the aquaculture value chain and connect Read More…

Researchers seek better ways to farm popular Pacific fish

Phys Org – The dark gray fish prized for its buttery flavor live deep in the ocean, so researchers keep their lab cold and dark to simulate ideal conditions for sablefish larvae. A biologist shines his dim red headlamp and uses an ultrasound to scan the belly of an anesthetized sablefish about the length of his forearm to tell if it's female and has eggs to collect. He gently squeezes out Read More…

Tilapia production grew 223 pc in ten years

FIS – Between 2005 and 2015, the production of the most farmed fish in Brazil, tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), experienced a 223 per cent growth thanks to the modernization and intensification of its production, both in cages and in containers dug in the ground. In 2005, tilapia production in the country was 67,850.50 tonnes, according to the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Read More…

Norway reports dramatic drop in fish escapes

Fish Update – Norway is claiming success in reducing the number of fish escaping from its fish farms – thanks to an industry wide effort. According to the Norwegian  directorate of fisheries 126,000 salmon and 62,000 rainbow trout escaped last year compared to 170,000 salmon and 84,000 trout in 2015. So far this year fish farms have reported very few escaped fish. The latest figures Read More…