Scientific Study Contradicts Basis for State Water Board’s River…

Fox And Hounds – A new environmental study, published in in the prestigious North American Journal of Fisheries Management, reveals that Governor Jerry Brown’s State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) imposed so-called pulse-flow release requirements on water rights holders affecting several California rivers, operating from unproven beliefs the study now shows were without sufficient Read More…

Yuba Salmon Numbers Drop Again

Yuba Net – Less than 4,000 salmon spawned in the Yuba River in 2016 according to a Monitoring Update from the Yuba Accord River Management Team. Such low numbers have not been seen since the California Salmon Stock Collapse of 2007 and 2008 when the estimated total for the Yuba River was 2,604 and 3,508 salmon, respectively. Over the last 30 years, the average annual estimate exceeds 15,000 Read More…

Snorkel School: Diving Into Big Chico Creek with Chico State

Ecological Reserves News – The streams and tributaries that feed the Upper Sacramento River of Northern California are critical habitats for several species of salmonids listed under the state and federal Endangered Species Act, and as a result many have become some of the most well-studied creeks. Big Chico Creek, a 45-mile waterway that runs through the heart of Chico, California, is one Read More…

Sacramento Electrofishing Training

Smith-Root – The 7 year drought in California has come to an end. Despite near record precipitation, Southern California still has a huge need to import large volumes of water from Northern California. Several government agencies and private companies are responsible for not only transferring water in large canals to Southern California, but they are also responsible for monitoring the Read More…

Study Shows Fall Flows Down The Stan Could Be Halved

My Mother Lode – The volume of water being flushed down the Stanislaus River for fall fish flows can effectively be cut by half. So says a recently released long-term study by researchers from FISHBIO in Oakdale that focused on the fall pulse flows and their impact on adult salmon migration. The findings point out a clear need for reassessing the allocation to better balance beneficial Read More…

Eating Endangered Species

The Manteca Bulletin – For years, the Bureau of Reclamation has tried to comply with the Endangered Species Act when it comes to protecting Chinook salmon and steelhead on the Stanislaus River by releasing more and more water. Legislation signed by President Obama in the waning days of his administration contains specific language requiring federal agencies to work with the South San Read More…

Study questions Stanislaus releases for salmon in fall

The Modesto Bee – A new study concludes that salmon have not benefited much from autumn water releases into the lower Stanislaus River. The research by the Fishbio consulting firm backs up claims by the Oakdale and South San Joaquin irrigation districts that the October releases are wasting water from New Melones Reservoir. The “pulse flows” are done on San Joaquin River Read More…

Study: Salmon don’t want too much water

The Modesto Bee – Salmon don’t read memos or get emails from the state Department of Water Resources, nor do they consult U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service instruction manuals. So how can they possibly know when it’s time to spawn? Over hundreds of thousands of years, salmon have learned to “read” signals that nature provides and only they truly understand. Those signals tell them Read More…

Study Casts Doubt on State’s Strategy

The Oakdale Leader – A scientific study covering 11 years of fish migration on the Stanislaus River underscores how simply sending more water downstream may not be doing endangered Chinook salmon any favors. Data shows there is a certain threshold for pulse flow volume that, if it is exceeded, doesn’t improve fish migration. It also points to other solutions such as the placement of the Read More…

Pulse Flows A Bit Fishy

Manteca Bulletin– A scientific study covering 11 years of fish migration on the Stanislaus River underscores how simply sending more water downstream may not be doing endangered Chinook salmon any favors. Data shows there is a certain threshold for pulse flow volume that if it is exceeded doesn’t improve fish migration. It also points to other solutions such as the placement of the rock Read More…