Industrial Fishing Occupies a Third of the Planet

National Geographic – How do you study the world's more widespread predator? By spying from space. When a team of researchers set out to see how prevalent industrial fishing was around the world—who was fishing where and when—they were met with a dearth of information. They lacked access to vessel monitoring systems closely held by regional fishery managers, says Juan Mayorga, a Read More…

Japan may exceed blue fin tuna catches again

FIS – For the second consecutive year, Japan may exceed its quota on small bluefin tuna caught in the Pacific Ocean, not respecting international restrictions. Last January, the Fishery Agency urged coastal fishers to cease the small bluefin tuna catch weighing less than 30 kilograms until June, because Japan was approaching its quota of 3,424 tonnes for the current fishing season, which Read More…

Chinese trawlers travel farthest and fish the most

Reuters – China has the world’s largest and farthest-ranging fishing operation, outstripping the next 10 biggest combined, according to what researchers say is the most comprehensive and data-intensive study on the subject. Ships from China amassed approximately 17 million hours of fishing in 2016, mostly off the southern coast of their home country, but also as far away as Africa and Read More…

Ocean Refuge the Size of Great Britain Announced

National Geographic – The government of the Seychelles has created two new marine protected areas in the country's remote Indian Ocean archipelago. The sanctioned areas will cover more than 81,000 square miles—a swath of space about the size of Great Britain. The protected areas will be rolled out in two phases. The first phase will cover 29,000 square miles around the remote Aldabra Read More…

Rising sea levels put Pacific salt marshes at risk for extinction,…

UCLA Newsroom – Climate change is dialing up the pressure on species around the world. Polar bears may be the most iconic example, but creatures from corals to elephants are all affected by a warming, changing planet. Individual species aren’t the only ones at risk of extinction. In the case of Pacific coastal wetlands, an entire ecosystem type could be wiped out by a rise in the sea Read More…

First evidence that seals can consume microplastics via their prey

Phys Org – Microplastics can transfer up the food chain from fish to top predators, such as seals, reveals new research by Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML), University of Exeter and the Cornish Seal Sanctuary. Microplastics are a widespread pollutant of the marine environment that can be inadvertently consumed by zooplankton, fish and even larger filter-feeders, such as whales. Now, for Read More…

NOAA Fisheries charts progress for West Coast species at risk

NOAA News – NOAA Fisheries recently submitted its biennial Report to Congress on the status of threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), including five West Coast species at high risk of extinction. The report summarizes efforts to recover 93 species under NOAA Fisheries’ jurisdiction from October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2016. While nearly a Read More…

Now you see us: how casting an eerie glow on fish can help count and…

Phys Org – News stories about fish often focus either on large fish like sharks, or on tasty seafood. So it might come as a surprise that more than half of the fish on coral reefs are tiny and well camouflaged. This naturally makes them hard to find, and as a result we know very little about these so-called "cryptic" species. Now my colleagues and I have developed a new method to make Read More…

Nine more stocks than in 2017 are now fished at sustainable levels

FIS – Fishing businesses taht operate in the Atlantic, North Sea and Baltic Sea are obtaining higher profits due to a solid recovery of popular fish stocks like North Sea cod, which were severely depleted some years ago. This, according to EU authorities, indicates that Common Fisheries Policy’s focus on sustainable fishing is contributing to this record, both for fishermen and fish Read More…

Waters on track to rise for centuries, even if emissions stop

E&E News – It's a given of climate change that greenhouse gases emitted today will shape the world for future generations. But new research underscores just how long those effects will last. A striking new study published yesterday in the journal Nature Communications suggests that sea-level rise — one of the biggest consequences of global warming — will still be happening 300 Read More…