Robot squares up against lionfish in battle to save marine ecology

The National – They can perform surgery, make cars and are fine waiters, but now robots are being used to catch an invasive breed of fish to save the marine environment. Lionfish are venomous, predatory creatures that are breeding out of control and destroying marine ecosystems in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean. "On reefs where sport divers are actively diving with harpoons to try Read More…

Progress Made Towards Sustainable Tuna Fishing

The Maritime Executive – In its second canned tuna ranking, Greenpeace USA found that a number of U.S. retailers have made significant progress toward offering consumers more sustainable and ethical products. The tuna ranking evaluated the sourcing policies and practices of 20 brands, including whether the fishing method used to catch their tuna harms other marine life, whether they avoid Read More…

Coastal Ecosystem is Endangered as The Water Temperature Increases,…

The Science Times – A recent study finds the rising of water temperature poses a permanent damage to the ecosystem in the coastal area. When the water temperature rises, A greenhouse gas that endangers the health of ecosystem also increase. In their latest research, marine biologists from the University of Georgia, James Hollibaugh and Sylvia Schaefer finds the correlation between the Read More…

The Blood of the Crab

Popular Mechanics – Meghan Owings plucks a horseshoe crab out of a tank and bends its helmet-shaped shell in half to reveal a soft white membrane. Owings inserts a needle and draws a bit of blood. "See how blue it is," she says, holding the syringe up to the light. It really is. The liquid shines cerulean in the tube. When she's done with the show and tell, Owings squirts the contents of Read More…

Fewer sharks equals fatter fish, research shows

UPI – As shark populations decline, fish face less pressure from the top of the food chain. As a result, new research shows, fish are getting fatter. Researchers from the University of Western Australia and the Australian Institute of Marine Science studied fish behavior in Rowley Shoals and Scott Reefs. The former, a marine preserve, hosts healthy shark populations. The latter, an Read More…

Scientists: Cod population in New England drops 80 percent

Sea Coast Online – This headline was shocking when it appeared in the Herald on April 3. Eighty percent in 10 years in spite of widespread efforts to recover codfish all that time. What is going on? As it happened, I had the good fortune to run across a couple of recent studies of the Gulf of Maine that gave me some insight. Yes, overfishing has been an issue, but there is more. The biggest Read More…

Sea Lions In California Are Dying From A Toxic Algae That Ravages…

Huffington Post – Algae so toxic that it’s causing fatal brain damage in California sea lions is the latest problem plaguing ocean animal rescue operations along the Pacific coast. Domoic acid poisoning is emerging as a key threat this year to the animals that ingest the toxin while eating fish and other sea creatures that feed on algae, rescue organizations in southern Read More…

Bizarre bivalve: first living giant shipworm discovered in Philippines

The Guardian – About three feet long and glistening black with a pink, fleshy appendage, it looks like the entrails of an alien from a bad horror film. In fact, it is a giant shipworm. Discovered in the mud of a shallow lagoon in the Philippines, a living creature of the species has never been described before – even though its existence has been known for more than 200 years thanks to Read More…

The pristine Arctic has become a garbage trap for 300 billion pieces…

Washington Post – Drifts of floating plastic that humans have dumped into the world’s oceans are flowing into the pristine waters of the Arctic as a result of a powerful system of currents that deposits waste in the icy seas east of Greenland and north of Scandinavia. In 2013, as part of a seven-month circumnavigation of the Arctic Ocean, scientists aboard the research vessel Tara Read More…

NOAA Fisheries Scientists Spawn Pacific Sardines For The First Time…

NOAA News – Biologists at NOAA Fisheries’ Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) have cracked the code for how to spawn Pacific sardines in the laboratory, opening a new window on the life cycle of the commercially important species. Like many species, sardines require just the right conditions to reproduce. Researchers working with sardines in the SWFSC’s Experimental Aquarium Read More…