East Bay: Threatened fish get truckin’ with a lift to spawning…

East Bay Times – Larger than usual numbers of threatened steelhead trout swam from the ocean into Alameda Creek after heavy rains this year — and ran into the same concrete barriers that have blocked their migration for decades. On Wednesday, the fish got a lift in a decades long campaign to bring back the steelhead, an iconic seagoing trout, to the Bay Area’s largest Read More…

Oregon FW Commission Moves Closer To Washington State With Harvest,…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – At the urging of Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission for the second time in two months changed Oregon harvest reform rules at its March 17 meeting in Corvallis, bringing the rules closer to those adopted by the Washington Commission in January. The two-state harvest reform rules initially called for the removal of all commercial Read More…

Shrinking Salton Sea threatens wildlife

Record Searchlight – Over the years, many of the birds that visit Shasta County have found a migratory fuel stop in the richness of the Salton Sea, a short hour’s drive from Palm Springs. The flood that re-created it must have been of almost Biblical proportions.  In 1905-07, canal levees were breached, sending the entire flow of the Colorado River into a vast basin – the bed of the Read More…

Listed Steelhead Move Into New Habitat Created By Removal Of Obsolete…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – When a couple of concerned citizens witnessed adult steelhead spawning downstream from an obsolete dam outside a small town in Idaho, local agencies came together to remove the fish barrier and restore passage to historic spawning grounds unattainable for nearly 100 years. City of Troy’s mayor Ken Whitney said Cliff Swanson lives on the outskirts of this Read More…

Endangered Trout Get Human Help Moving Through East Bay Creek

ABC 7 News – Endangered Steelhead Trout trying to get upstream to spawn in the East Bay got a boost from humans Wednesday as they tried to get over a concrete barrier. Five Steelhead Trout were netted in the process including four males and a female. That may not sound like a lot, but fishery manager Joe Sullivan says it's a bonanza. "A single female can have 8,000 eggs, so they can Read More…

Electrical Problem Kills 600,000 Salmon in N. Idaho Hatchery

US News – About 600,000 young spring chinook salmon have died at a northern Idaho fish hatchery after an electrical problem stopped water from circulating. The Nez Perce Tribe tells the Lewiston Tribune that the fish died at the Kooskia National Fish Hatchery on Friday when an electrical circuit breaker tripped and a warning system to alert hatchery workers failed. The salmon were a Read More…

Boaters warned of WS River fish traps

Hood River News – A rotary screw trap for fisheries research is being temporarily installed again this year on the lower White Salmon River. The fish trap will be used by the U.S. Geological Survey and Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group to monitor migrant juvenile salmon and steelhead. The work is part of a broader assessment of fish recolonization of the White Salmon River after the Read More…

Drought kept steelhead out of Cambria’s creeks

The Tribune – The drought dried up Santa Rosa Creek, but this winter’s rains have opened its flowing waters to the sea. The creek broke through Dec. 16 and flowed at higher-than-normal levels for more than two months. A sandbar has now enclosed it, creating a lagoon. “Days of rain brought water into the main stem of Santa Rosa Creek and all the tributaries,” said Stephanie Wald, Read More…

High river flows help habitat restoration along Sacramento River

KRCR 7 News – Construction crews at Keswick Dam are working to restore salmon habitats by adding gravel to the river. Similar projects have happened for several years. The most recent were along Market Street and at Keswick Dam in September 2016. Jan Raether with the Western Shasta Resource Conservation District said the project is contracted through the Bureau of Reclamation and is Read More…

UCLA conservation biologists witness wildlife’s comeback after…

UCLA Newsroom – After five years of excruciating drought, California’s wildlife finally has a reason to celebrate. This vernal equinox — the first day of spring — flora and fauna from Palos Verdes to the Yosemite Valley have been rejuvenated by a historically wet and snowy winter. Life is sprouting, hopping, buzzing and flapping everywhere as ecosystems recharge. It has been good Read More…