Study Looks At How Elwha Dam Removals Changed Nearshore Ecosystems…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – In the time since the removal of two dams on Washington’s Elwha River, scientists from University of Washington-based Washington Sea Grant, the U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Department of Natural Resources, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the Environmental Protection Agency and the UW have sifted through eight years of data collected before and after the Read More…

Salmon smolt falling prey to bass as they leave Miramichi River

CBC – A newly published three-year study says large numbers of Atlantic salmon smolt are being eaten by striped bass as the smolts leave New Brunswick's Miramichi River and enter the Gulf of St. Lawrence for open ocean. The report, published this week in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, estimates striped bass are eating two to 18 per cent of salmon smolts. Smolts Read More…

Lanternfish reveal how ocean warming impacts the twilight zone

Phys Org – A new study from the British Antarctic Survey shows how lanternfish, small bioluminescent fish, are likely to respond to the warming of the Southern Ocean. Lanternfish are one of the most abundant groups of organisms in the oceans and inhabit the 'twilight' zone, the part of the ocean between 200 – 1000 metres which only a small amount of sunlight reaches. They are an Read More…

Long-Term Idaho Salmon Supplementation Study Delivers Mixed Results;…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – A newly published study finds that hatchery supplementation after 22 years in two Idaho drainages, increased chinook salmon abundance at some life stages, but the effects did not persist after supplementation of hatchery stock ceased and had no apparent influence on productivity. The study, according to its authors, represents one of the largest manipulative Read More…

Treated Wastewater Contains Compounds that Impair Ecologically…

Environmental Monitor – As the apex predator on the block, it’s not always easy for humans to imagine the heightened awareness and sensitivity to surroundings that allow prey animals to survive. But the feelings of relaxation and reduced anxiety that elevated levels of serotonin in the brain, and many prescription antidepressants, bring humans, aren’t productive in other animals. New Read More…

Rapid Scan for Salmon Sickness

Hakai Magazine – Until now, a pathologist seeking to determine a salmon’s cause of death might scrutinize a set of tissue samples under a microscope or culture a bacterial or viral sample over several days to isolate the cause of the disease. All of that is changing fast at the federal Pacific Biological Station (PBS) in Nanaimo, British Columbia, where researchers have created a novel, Read More…

A Covered Cod-End and Tow-Path Evaluation of Midwater Trawl Gear…

San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science – For nearly 50 years, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife has used a midwater trawl to intensively monitor fish populations in the San Francisco Estuary during the fall, sampling over 100 locations each month. The data collected have been useful for calculating indices of fish abundance and for detecting and documenting the decline of Read More…

How Nuclear Bombs Helped Scientists Find the Age of this Gigantic…

Newsweek – Off the coast of Hawaii in 2009, two fishermen caught an enormous grander blue marlin weighing in at 1,245 lbs and measuring 12.2 feet long. Conservationists wondered, how long does it take for these animals to reach this size? It turned out that the answer lies in tiny bones in the marlin’s ears, according to a new report. Although the animal was huge, certain ear bones Read More…

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion

Phys Org – Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps Read More…

Hatchery Fish Often Fail in the Wild. Now We Might Know Why

Hakai Magazine – Wild salmon are struggling to get their groove back. Along North America’s Pacific coast, salmon populations—already hit by overfishing—have been forced to dodge the Blob and hungry seals. For years, Canada has tried to help bolster the salmon population by releasing hatchery-raised juvenile fish, or smolts, into the wild. Scientists know these hatchery smolts Read More…