Fish cooperate for selfish reasons

Phys Org – Why do animals help raise offspring that aren't their own? A new study by an international team of researchers from Sweden, Canada and the UK shows that fish cooperate to raise another fish's offspring to reduce their own risk of being eaten by a predator. In an article published yesterday in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution John Fitzpatrick, a lecturer at Stockholm Read More…

Scientists find small effect from hydroelectric projects on…

Hydro World – Research recently released by the Environment Agency indicates the construction of run-of-river hydroelectric projects in England and Wales results in a very small but statistically significant reduction in the proportion of invertebrates of different families (called evenness). Run-of-river schemes are often presumed to be less ecologically damaging than large-scale Read More…

Venom of reef fish to take pain out of illness

NT News – A popular aquarium fish could hold the key to the next generation of powerful ­painkillers. New research from the ­University of Queensland has shown the venom of a coral reef fish found on the Great Barrier Reef contains a heroin-like substance that stops pain rather than causes it. Lead researcher Bryan Fry said fang blenny fish use two large-fanged teeth to ­inject Read More…

Marine research under threat

The Fish Site – New plans to pull funding from Alaska Sea Grant a year earlier than previously announced, have inspired director, Paula Cullenberg, to issue an impassioned plea to fellow Alaskans to help save the marine research and education program. Alaska Sea Grant is a partnership between the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Atmospheric and Oceanographic Administration Read More…

First ever cavefish discovered in Europe evolved super-fast

New Scientist – Europe’s first cavefish has been discovered by a cave diver in Germany. The pale-coloured loach, shown above, is thought to have diverged from surface fish as glaciers from the last ice age receded some 16,000 to 20,000 years ago. “Our first genetic studies, plus knowledge of the geological history of the region, suggest the cave loach population is amazingly young, Read More…

Predators may be less affected by catch of small fish than previously…

Market Wired – New research published today in the journal Fisheries Research finds that fishing of forage species likely has a lower impact on predators than previously thought, challenging previous studies that argued forage fish are more valuable left in the ocean. A team of seven respected fisheries scientists, led by Prof. Ray Hilborn, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, found Read More…

Salmon research award launched

The Fish Site – A new award to support research in salmon health and welfare by tomorrow’s industry leaders has been launched today. Called the High Quality Salmon Science Award, it has been initiated by MSD Animal Health (known as Merck Animal Health in the US and Canada) and will allow one recent graduate in veterinary or animal science the opportunity to present their research to an Read More…

Study Details Adult Spring Chinook Mortality From Willamette Falls To…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – Some 10 percent to 21 percent of adult spring chinook migrating in the Willamette River will die before reaching tributaries to spawn, according to a recent study, and the fish most likely to die are those that were injured downstream of Willamette Falls by sea lions, as well as from other migratory-related causes such as descaling and head Read More…

What?! Scientists Just Discovered a Fish That Could Survive on Land

Nature World News – Fish are known to depend on water as their habitat. In fact, in the absence of water, these creatures might die. However, a new study has revealed that some fish are evolving to survive on land. According to scientists at UNSW and the Australian National University, some species of fish have learned to live outside their usual habitat in a bid to stay safe and escape Read More…

What triggers salmon migrations?

UPI – Salmon migrate upstream in a unique pulse-like pattern. Biologists have observed the pattern in streams and rivers all over the world. But why? "The folk wisdom is that the salmon are all independently cueing off common environmental cues, and that tends to synchronize their movements," Andrew Berdahl, a research fellow at the Santa Fe Institute, explained in a news Read More…