Climate change challenges the survival of fish across the world

Science Daily – Climate change will force many amphibians, mammals and birds to move to cooler areas outside their normal ranges, provided they can find space and a clear trajectory among our urban developments and growing cities. But what are the chances for fish to survive as climate change continues to warm waters around the world? University of Washington researchers are tackling Read More…

‘Handedness’ in scale-eating fish

Phys Org – Two researchers from Nagoya University and the University of Toyama find scale-eating fish have a naturally stronger side for attacking prey fish, and learn to use the dominant side through experience. The preference for using one side of the body over the other, as observed typically in human handedness, is referred to as behavioral laterality. Increasing numbers of studies Read More…

Research into Foraging Behaviour of Juvenile Pacific Salmon and North…

Hydro International – Two PhD candidates are currently conducting studies that couple the capabilities of ASL's Acoustic Zooplankton Fish Profiler (AZFP) with predator telemetry and prey sampling to provide novel perspectives on predator/prey interactions in selected study regions in southern BC, Canada. Will Duguid is examining how interactions of tidal currents and abrupt topographic Read More…

Shaking up the fish family tree: ‘Living fossil’ not as old as we…

Phys Org – Polypterids are weird and puzzling African fish that have perplexed biologists since they were discovered during Napoleon's expedition to Egypt in the late 1700s. Often called living fossils, these eel-like misfits have lungs and fleshy pectoral fins, bony plates and thick scales reminiscent of ancient fossil fish, and flag-like fins along their back that are unique. For Read More…

Study: Take A Caught Fish Out Of Water, Stress Hormones Go Up, Harder…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – Adrenaline and noradrenaline, the "fight or flight" hormones, peak first, followed more gradually by cortisol. A new study http://jeb.biologists.org/content/220/14/2529 finds that largemouth bass whose cortisol levels rise most after a brief bout of stress are inherently harder to catch by angling. The discovery, reported in the Journal of Experimental Read More…

Anglers’ delight as algal blooms breakthrough highlights innovative…

Phys Org – Millions of fish-deaths caused by toxic Prymnesium algal blooms could be prevented with the application of a household chemical best known for bleaching hair, breakthrough research has revealed. Trials carried out in the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads National Park have shown that at controlled concentrations hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is deadly to Prymnesium parvum, the golden Read More…

Study links fish stress hormones to whether they take the bait

Phys Org – Take a fish out of water and its stress hormones will go up. Adrenaline and noradrenaline, the "fight or flight" hormones, peak first, followed more gradually by cortisol. A new study finds that largemouth bass whose cortisol levels rise most after a brief bout of stress are inherently harder to catch by angling. The discovery, reported in the Journal of Experimental Biology, Read More…

Deafness in farmed salmon linked to accelerated growth

Phys Org – Half of the world's farmed salmon are part deaf due to accelerated growth rates in aquaculture, new research has found. The results now offer a better understanding of the effects of a common inner ear deformity, and some specific actions to tackle this welfare issue. The research was led by the University of Melbourne and is published in the Journal of Experimental Read More…

The good, the bad and the algae

Science Daily – A new study is testing whether one of California’s largest and most polluted lakes can transform into one of its most productive and profitable. Southern California’s 350-square-mile Salton Sea has well-documented problems related to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural runoff. The research team intends to harness algae’s penchant for prolific Read More…

The fish can’t hear anything over all this noise

Motherboard – Keep it down, will ya? Underwater noise pollution caused by construction and development is stressing out fish and preventing them from properly escaping predators. In a study published Thursday, researchers from Newcastle University in the UK found that when they exposed European seabass to recorded sounds of drilling and piling (sticking large stakes in the ground as a Read More…