Study Details Adult Spring Chinook Mortality From Willamette Falls To…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – Some 10 percent to 21 percent of adult spring chinook migrating in the Willamette River will die before reaching tributaries to spawn, according to a recent study, and the fish most likely to die are those that were injured downstream of Willamette Falls by sea lions, as well as from other migratory-related causes such as descaling and head Read More…

What?! Scientists Just Discovered a Fish That Could Survive on Land

Nature World News – Fish are known to depend on water as their habitat. In fact, in the absence of water, these creatures might die. However, a new study has revealed that some fish are evolving to survive on land. According to scientists at UNSW and the Australian National University, some species of fish have learned to live outside their usual habitat in a bid to stay safe and escape Read More…

What triggers salmon migrations?

UPI – Salmon migrate upstream in a unique pulse-like pattern. Biologists have observed the pattern in streams and rivers all over the world. But why? "The folk wisdom is that the salmon are all independently cueing off common environmental cues, and that tends to synchronize their movements," Andrew Berdahl, a research fellow at the Santa Fe Institute, explained in a news Read More…

Non-Native Shad In John Day Reservoir Now A Food Source For Late…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – American shad, a species that is not indigenous to the Columbia River basin, is providing food in August for subyearling chinook salmon in the John Day Dam reservoir. About half a million shad migrate into the reservoir to spawn and by August, late migrating subyearling chinook change from a diet of plankton and Daphnia, a freshwater crustacean, and begin to Read More…

Study: Salmon Spawning Sites Used Year After Year Could Be Priority…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – Salmon tend to spawn in the same reaches of rivers year after year and knowing where could lead habitat restoration efforts in the future. A recent study of adult chinook salmon spawning in the upper Yakima River in Washington found that year to year reoccupation of spawning sites is high, especially when the measured scale is more than 2 kilometers (1.25 Read More…

Restoring predators and prey together speeds recovery

Northwest Fisheries Science Center – Restoring predator and prey species together helps accelerate ecosystem recovery efforts compared to pursuing restoration of one species at a time, new research concludes. A team of scientists from NOAA Fisheries, Oregon State University, the University of California Santa Barbara and Imperial College London used models and case studies to examine the Read More…

Forum Looks At Ocean, Estuary Research; Juvenile Salmon Stop, Feed,…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – Ocean and estuary research is getting a boost from a periodic Northwest Power and Conservation Council forum – the Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum. Chartered by the Council in 2015, the Forum meets two to three times a year (and has since 2013, two years prior to the charter) to discuss research that is largely focused on a clearer Read More…

Study shows how sea lions transmit salmon eating behavior

Wahkiakum County Eagle – A new study used the same kind of models that scientists use to track disease to instead examine how some California sea lions have learned to prey on salmon gathering to ascend fish ladders at Bonneville Dam. Although sea lions commonly feast on fish, their predation on salmon at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River poses wildlife management challenges. The sea Read More…

Winners, losers among fish when landscape undergoes change

Science Daily – A new study by the University of Washington and Simon Fraser University finds that some fish lose out while others benefit as urban and agricultural development encroaches on streams and rivers across the United States. Having a diversity of species, each with different land-use sensitivities and ecological functions, helps buffer ecosystems from failing in the face of Read More…

Fluorescence method detects mercury contamination in fish

Phys Org – Researchers from the University of Burgos (Spain) have developed a fluorescent polymer that lights up in contact with mercury that may be present in fish. High levels of the metal were detected in samples of swordfish and tuna. According to the conclusions of another Spanish study, mercury exposure is linked to reduced foetal and placental growth in pregnant women. The presence Read More…