Study: Ocean noise may hinder fish mating

Cape Cod Times – The party is noisy. The music and conversation drown out what you want to say. Welcome to the world of the cod, haddock and other fish species where it’s considerably harder because it’s done in the dark, 160 feet below the ocean surface, where vital communication — essentially “Here I am, over here!” — can be lost in the constant roar of ships passing Read More…

As River Warms Through McNary-John Day Pools, Juvenile Salmon Change…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – Subyearling fall chinook salmon lose weight as they migrate downriver through the McNary and John Day dam pools. Although their preferred food through these still waters is Daphnia, a naturally occurring small planktonic crustacean, warmer water requires more energy and the fish in August will turn to non-native juvenile America shad as a food Read More…

Fish exposed to treated wastewater have altered behavior

Science Daily – A team of researchers from Environment Canada and Climate Change Canada and McMaster University have found that fish living downstream from a wastewater treatment plant showed changes to their normal behaviour -- ones that made them vulnerable to predators -- when exposed to elevated levels of antidepressant drugs in the water. The findings, published as a series of three Read More…

‘Fish in the fields’ study to monitor effects of methane emissions

Appeal Democrat – A team of researchers and Marysville rice farmers initiated a study this week in Yuba County to see if introducing fish to a flooded rice field could both reduce methane emissions and allow for a new reliable protein source. Those involved say that, if successful, the study could provide a new way of decreasing the environmental footprint of rice production, mitigate the Read More…

Antidepressants from urine are making fish less afraid of predators

Phys Org – Antidepressants are making their way into our lakes and rivers—and they're making freshwater fish less fazed by predators. Jake Martin, a PhD candidate at Monash University, looked at how the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) responded to the threat of a predator when they had been exposed to the antidepressant fluoxetine (using levels similar to those already found Read More…

Scientists Watch Robotic Fish, Plants Acting ‘Naturally’

VOA – Scientists are using robotic devices to study the health of waters in and around Venice, Italy. The robots are designed to act like fish, other underwater creatures and plants. The scientists are working with several universities and research centers as part of a group called subCULTron. The European Union gives money to the project as part of its Horizon 2020 program. The aim Read More…

Floods are necessary for maintaining healthy river ecosystems,…

Phys Org – Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests. The study shows that alterations to rivers' natural flow patterns - because of dams, diversions and changes in precipitation - cause damage to riparian plant communities and river ecosystems in general. Even minor shifts in temporal flow Read More…

Schooling fish mainly react to one or two neighbors at a time

Phys Org – The study, published in PLOS Computational Biology, developed a new method combining behavioral analyses with a computer model to map the chain of direct interactions in a school of fish. The international research team, that includes the University of Bristol, found individual fish pay attention to its neighbours when the school moves together. Schooling fish exhibit Read More…

When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce

Science Daily – A new University of Washington study points to yet another human factor that is hampering the ability of fish to reproduce: the timing of our fishing seasons. The paper, appearing online last month in the journal Fish and Fisheries, is one of only a handful of studies that considers how the timing of fishing efforts might disproportionately target certain fish and change the Read More…

Erosion caused by spawning salmon could make mountains significantly…

Alaska Dispatch News – When salmon spawn, the females build nests (or "redds") by turning onto their sides and flapping their tails to stir up sediment. That can expose the riverbed and lead to erosion nearby and downstream. Such erosion is a well-studied phenomenon, but what is the effect over millennia? A study recently published in the journal Geomorphology found that over time, Read More…