L.A. River: Conflict Ahead as Water Capture, Restoration Plans…

News Deeply – Everyone knows the Los Angeles river. Even if it’s not part of your neighborhood, the concrete-lined channel is familiar worldwide, because nothing else in the movies or television better depicts “urban wasteland” than this drain. But soon this stark, 51-mile (82-km) waterway may symbolize something else: tough choices amid water scarcity. California’s historic Read More…

How climate change will mess with water ‘recharge’ in Western U.S.

Futurity – As the climate warms, the dry southern regions of the Western United States will have less groundwater recharge while the northern regions will have more, researchers report. “Our study asked what will be the effect of climate change on groundwater recharge in the Western US in the near future, 2021-2050, and the far future, 2070-2100,” says first author Rewati Niraula, who Read More…

County water agency officials call for rapid response to worsening…

Monterey Herald – Told by staff that northern Salinas Valley seawater intrusion is almost certainly worse now than it was two years ago, Monterey County Water Resources Agency board members called for an expedited response to the worsening problem. After agency staff predicted continued growth over the last two years of “islands” of salty water impinging on critical underground fresh Read More…

California had record water year. Why Central Valley must invest in…

The Sacramento Bee – Massive floods hit Houston and devastating hurricanes struck Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Yet one of the more remarkable stories in the past year is the catastrophe that did not happen: massive flooding in California. California experienced its wettest water year on record in 2016-17. In previous decades, that huge volume of water would have caused lethal floods, Read More…

One of the first projects in LA County to capture storm water is…

Press-Telegram – The thousands of miles of concrete channels diverting street water from the San Gabriel and Los Angeles rivers represent the last major water project in Los Angeles County, built almost 100 years ago. On Thursday, Dave Sorem, owner and vice president of Mike Bubalo Construction Co., showed off the first of a second wave of street-water projects that elevate what is Read More…

Atmospheric river brings rain to the Bay Area, snow to the Sierra…

Mercury News – Once again High Street in Oakland, Calif., is flooded causing commuters to drive through at least a foot of water on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2017. (Laura A. Oda/ Bay Area News Group) As expected, an “atmospheric river” delivered moderate to heavy rain to the Bay Area on Thursday. The North Bay and Santa Cruz mountains received a majority of the rainfall, with a handful of Read More…

Study: Media Coverage of Drought Spurred California Water Conservation

News Deeply – When the California drought began to take hold in 2011, a mysterious thing happened: People began cutting back drastically on their water consumption – even before mandatory conservation was ordered by their local water agencies and state government. Newsha Ajami, director of Urban Water Policy with Stanford University’s Water in the West program, started hearing Read More…

Satellites Accurately Capture Ocean Salinity in the Arctic

EOS – Monitoring ocean salinity is essential for understanding its impact on ocean circulation, Earth’s water cycle, marine ecology, and climate change. Ocean salinity in the Arctic is of particular interest because it changes significantly with seasonal ice cover and is expected to decrease as the Greenland ice sheet melts and releases massive amounts of freshwater. Despite its Read More…

Mediterranean California’s water use future under multiple…

PLOS One – With growing demand and highly variable inter-annual water supplies, California’s water use future is fraught with uncertainty. Climate change projections, anticipated population growth, and continued agricultural intensification, will likely stress existing water supplies in coming decades. Using a state-and-transition simulation modeling approach, we examine a broad suite of Read More…

Colorado River’s connection with the ocean was a punctuated affair

Science Daily – The Colorado River's initial trip to the ocean didn't come easy, but its story has emerged from layers of sediment preserved within tectonically active stretches of the waterway's lower reaches. A scientific team, led by geologist Rebecca Dorsey of the University of Oregon, theorizes that the river's route off the Colorado Plateau was influenced by a combination of Read More…