MID weighs releasing sale contract, but critics vocal

Modesto BeeBy Ken CarlsonJune 25, 2012 As district leaders decide today whether to release a revised water-sale proposal, Modesto Irrigation District officials were pushing aside concerns raised by the city of Modesto and farmers regarding the 2,240 acre-foot sale to San Francisco. MID board President Tom Van Groningen said Monday evening that the board will decide at its meeting today whether Read More…

High levels of lead found in Indian Ocean

United Press InternationalJune 27, 2012 U.S. researchers say they have discovered high concentrations of lead in the Indian Ocean despite leaded gasoline having been slowly phased out worldwide. While leaded gasoline usage has decreased drastically in the last few decades, lead is still pervasive in the environment, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported. MIT ocean Read More…

Salmon ready for a summer fight

Stockton RecordBy Peter OttesenJune 27, 2012 Salmon mania has struck the Central Coast, from Monterey to Bodega Bay, with large kings, 12 to 34 pounds, giving anglers their best season since the resource hit rock bottom nearly a decade ago, closing all commercial and sport fishing for many years. Take your pick. Schools of salmon were found this week off the canyon and the Soquel Hole in Read More…

Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, Alaska state biologists…

Kansas City StarBy Richard MauerJune 26, 2012 Something in the ocean has been death to Alaska's king salmon. The state's iconic fish, treasured for food, sport and cash, should now be swimming in droves up rivers from the Southeast rain forests to the populated Railbelt and the Western Alaska tundra. But they're not. To preserve future runs, state officials are clamping down throughout Read More…

How fish food rises from ocean depths

PhysJune 26, 2012 The research, published in the journal Continental Shelf Research, represents an international breakthrough in the understanding of the dynamics of coastal upwelling systems. Upwelling centres are regions in which vast amounts of dissolved nutrients are brought into the surface layers of the ocean. Associate Professor Kaempf said that although they occupy only one-tenth of one Read More…

Mystery of the Flatfish Head Solved

Alaska Native NewsJune 25, 2012 Those delicious flatfishes, like halibut and sole, are also evolutionary puzzles. Their profoundly asymmetrical heads have one of the most unusual body plans among all backboned animals (vertebrates) but the evolution of their bizarre anatomy has long been a mystery. How did flatfishes, with both of their eyes on one side of their head, evolve? So puzzling was Read More…

A fresh take on sustainable fishing

Mercury NewsBy Patrick MayJune 24, 2012 On a sunlight-laced morning, 15 coolers sit on the driveway behind Sandabs seafood restaurant in Scotts Valley, each filled with sablefish fillets glistening in treasure chests of molded plastic filled with chipped ice. The fish Alan Lovewell and Oren Frey load into their van are to-die-for fresh. So fresh, the sablefish still think they're swimming off Read More…

All indications point to possible banner sockeye salmon returns

Seattle TimesBy Mark YuasaJune 22, 2012 This summer could very well be the "Year of the Sockeye Salmon." Sockeye returns are bountiful in the Columbia and Skagit river systems, but the unexpected highlight is the early robust counts for Lake Washington. "The outlook on each of those fronts is really positive, and all seems to be playing out well and consistent for sockeye," said Pat Pattillo Read More…

Corps focused on improving dams for fish

Daily Journal of CommerceBy Lee FehrenbacherJune 21, 2012 Fish in the Willamette River Basin are dying and biologists aren’t exactly sure why. A big problem is something called pre-spawn mortality. “Fish can make it all the way to the ocean and all the way back again, and right before they’re ready to spawn, they die,” said Chris Budai, project manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Read More…

Three B.C. scientists attack changes to Fisheries Act

Canadian PressBy Keven DrewsJune 21, 2012 Three scientists from B.C. have used an internationally prestigious journal to launch an attack against changes to the federal Fisheries Act currently before the Senate. In a letter published online Thursday in the journal “Science,” the scientists from Simon Fraser University criticize cutbacks at eco-toxicology labs and an aquatic research Read More…