Oceans’ reefs at risk from carbon emissions

U.S.News & World ReportBy Jason KoeblerAugust 1, 2012Not all carbon emissions find their way into Earth's atmosphere—about half of it is absorbed by vegetation and the world's oceans. On the one hand, that helps limit carbon's climate-changing effects. But on the other, it can deliver what a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientist calls a "double whammy" to the Read More…

Sea lion predation: most at-risk spring Chinook from Clearwater,…

The Columbia Basin BulletinAugust 3, 2012Sea Lion predation dynamics change from year-to-year below the lower Columbia River’s Bonneville Dam but a constant, it appears, is that early arriving salmon stocks, including some protected under the Endangered Species Act, take a bigger hit, according to a research article published last week in the American Fisheries Society’s journal, Read More…

Conservationists seek protection for Columbia River salmon

ExaminerBy Jean WilliamsAugust 3, 2012This week, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of Hood River Waterfront and the Northwest Environmental Defense Center filed a second formal notice of intent to sue in order to protect endangered fish species in Columbia River from a major development, which was approved on Monday by the Hood River City Council.The joint notice of intent was filed by Read More…

Fall salmon season underway on the Klamath

The Times-StandardBy Kenny PriestAugust 2, 2012Buckle up and enjoy the ride - the fall salmon season is underway on the Klamath River. In what is projected to be a record, 380,000 adult fall Chinook salmon are slated to return to the Klamath basin (including the Trinity River) this year. The in-river sport allocation is 67,600 fish, which is more than double any previous quota. If all the Read More…

Possible new all-time or single-month record steelhead catch in the…

The Seattle TimesBy Mark YuasaAugust 1, 2012The steelhead catch may have dropped off but it looks like July could go down as a new record catch in the Lower Columbia River."We may have a new record for steelhead handled in July, and I'm just adding up the final numbers as we speak," said Joe Hymer, a state Fish and Wildlife biologist. "Oregon will put together theirs and we'll see what we've got Read More…

Fisheries board throws setnetters a lifeline

The Sacramento BeeBy Mary PembertonAugust 1, 2012The Alaska fisheries board has rejected a petition from Kenai River sport fishermen to keep the setnet fishermen sitting on the beach in August.The petition from the Kenai River Sportfishing Association sought to prevent setnetters with hundreds of permits from fishing for red and pink salmon. That means under the existing management plan the Kenai Read More…

Yakama Nation study fishing for answers about steelhead population

Yakima Herald-RepublicBy David LesterAugust 1, 2012A three-year study is trying to connect the dots on steelhead. And the picture that is emerging from early results on this complex and threatened species contains some surprises for fisheries scientists.Steelhead, an ocean-going trout species, are finding their way into Yakima River Basin tributaries few had expected, such as Wenas Creek north of Read More…

DFG Surveys Salmon Anglers on Central Valley Rivers

DFG NewsAugust 1, 2012 The Department of Fish and Game’s (DFG) Central Valley angler surveys have begun on the American, Feather, Mokelumne and Sacramento rivers. Over the next five months, survey crews will repeatedly visit 20 different sections of river to cover the full extent of the inland salmon fishery. Survey crews count the number of boats and anglers, weigh and measure each fish Read More…

Global warming could help pesky fish pest

ABC ScienceBy Anna SallehAugust 1, 2012Global warming could advantage one pesky marine species while disadvantaging its predator, a new study suggests.The study, of the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) and its predator, the Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata), is published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. "Mosquitofish are very aggressive - they eat lots of Read More…

It’s the world’s slowest shark — hang on, it’ll be here in a…

MSNBCBy Jennifer ViegasJuly 31, 2012Greenland sharks are the slowest known sharks, according to a new study that found these sharks move through the water at only about a mile per hour.The study, which will be published in the September issue of the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, also finds that the sharks are the slowest known fish, when body size is factored in. Greenland Read More…