2020 salmon returns have been so poor that Alaska communities already…

Anchorage Daily News — Unless you fished for salmon this summer at Bristol Bay, it’s been slim pickings for fishermen in other Alaska regions. Salmon returns have been so poor that communities already are claiming fishery disasters. Cordova’s City Council last week unanimously passed a resolution asking the state to declare disasters for both the 2018 Copper River sockeye and Read More…

B.C. marine ecologist wants Canada to sink its teeth into shark…

Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows News — Parks Canada expert Meaghen McCord says Canada is well-positioned to play a significant role in global efforts to save sharks from extinction. There are an estimated 73 million to 100 million sharks removed from the ocean every year through fishing, she said. “It’s a totally shocking number. You can assume that’s pretty unsustainable and that’s Read More…

Sea Bass Don’t Like Surprises

Hakai Magazine — Imagine you are quietly reading this story at home when—bang—you hear a loud crash nearby. You whirl your head toward the sound—a behavioral response—while your heart starts racing—a physiological response. These stress responses can mean the difference between life and death. How these processes play out in the brains of humans and other mammals is well Read More…

Innovative anchoring for the aquaculture industry

The Fish Site — A consortium of researchers has taken a significant step forward in the development of anchoring technology that could support the aquaculture sector’s ambitions to deliver long-term sustainable growth and reduce its environmental impact. For the past year, tidal energy technology specialist Sustainable Marine Energy Ltd (SME); the University of Dundee; marine equipment Read More…

5 B.C. First Nations call out Canada for ‘discriminatory’ food…

Maple Ridge -Pitt Meadows News — Five western Vancouver Island First Nations have called on the federal government to take “meaningful action” and “redirect” surplus allocation of chinook salmon to their communities. The First Nations are irked by the “disregard” of the federal government when they continue to prioritize tourists and recreational fishers over their food fish Read More…

Purple urchin has overrun kelp forests, commercial divers and…

The Mendocino Voice — Fort Bragg resident Patrick Downie has been diving for red urchin for 40 years. When he started, the industry was a lucrative one, offering a job he felt lucky to have, where he could make enough money to live comfortably and have a little extra to save. Now, he is barely hanging on, making as much as he is spending to keep up with maintenance on his boat and dive gear. Read More…

Crews stock 700+ greenback cutthroat in stream in Poudre River system…

ABC 7 Denver — More than 700 greenback cutthroat trout were stocked in a stream in the Poudre River system last week as part of the ongoing effort to revive the population of Colorado’s state fish – once believed to be extinct. The efforts to re-stock small streams with the trout species native to Colorado has been ongoing for several years after descendants of the last wild Read More…

Game and Fish seeks to protect streamflows for Colorado River…

Wyoming News Now — Two stream segments of crucial native trout habitat are proposed for streamflow protection in Wyoming. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is seeking instream flow water rights for sections of Trail Ridge Creek and Rock Creek in the Upper Green River drainage. The water rights are important to maintaining populations of Colorado River Cutthroat Trout in their native range. Read More…

50 years after hitting endangered species list, Lahontan cutthroat…

Reno Gazette Journal — A half century after the Lahontan cutthroat trout were added to the endangered species list, a self-sustaining population of the fish is thriving in Summit Lake in Northern Nevada. For nearly a decade, members of the Summit Lake Paiute Tribe and scientists at the Global Water Center at the University of Nevada, Reno have studied Summit Lake to understand why Nevada’s Read More…

They outlived dinosaurs, but can glass sponge reefs survive man-made…

Mongabay — When scientists first discovered glass sponge reefs in British Columbia’s waters in the late 1980s, they couldn’t have been more surprised. Prior to this, they believed that glass sponge reefs went extinct 40 million years ago. “If you think of it, it’s like stumbling upon a whole herd of dinosaurs in our backyards,” says Angela Stevenson, a researcher based in Read More…