California’s Complex Water Market Faces New Challenges

Institutional Investor — California has an intricate and multifaceted system of water management. The state’s $1.1 billion water market allocates a concentrated supply to the areas that need it most. From farming to landscaping and personal consumption, there is a constant tension in the state’s supply and demand of this life-sustaining resource. Rivers, Lakes and Aquifers In Read More…

Feather River Fish Hatchery Steps in to Raise Inland Chinook Salmon…

CDFW News — In addition to destroying and threatening thousands of homes and businesses, the devastating Glass Fire in Napa and Sonoma counties jeopardized the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Inland Chinook Salmon Program – until the Feather River Fish Hatchery in Oroville came to the rescue. The Feather River Fish Hatchery is owned and maintained by the California Read More…

Researchers publish rebuttal of prior study on ocean acidification…

PhysOrg — A group of thirteen researchers from six countries has released a new scientific paper rejecting an earlier study claiming ocean acidification has no effects of the behavior of coral reef fishes. Earlier this year, a paper by Clark et al. published in Nature claimed that previous experiments on the effects of elevated CO2 on reef fish behavior could not be repeated, and argued Read More…

Finding ‘breathable’ seas may get tough for marine critters

World Economic Forum — Laboratory experiments indicate that many marine creatures could theoretically tolerate temperatures far higher than what they encounter today. But these studies don’t mean that marine animals can maintain their current ranges in warmer oceans, says Curtis Deutsch, a professor of oceanography at the University of Washington. “Temperature alone does not Read More…

China’s illegal distant water fishing destroying economies,…

DNA India — Chinese vessels indulging in Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of a number of countries are destroying the economies and the environment, it has emerged. This is especially impacting developing countries and coastal countries, and contributing to decreasing in fish stocks including that of endangered fish species across Read More…

California’s Landmark Groundwater Law Falls Short, Advocates Say

CapRadio — In the midst of the last drought, California took its first step to regulate how the state uses groundwater. But advocates worry the new rules have favored big agricultural users over small communities, particularly in areas like the San Joaquin Valley. That legislation, officially called the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, created a new framework to figure out how to Read More…

A whopping 39.5% of the U.S. is in moderate to exceptional drought

WTSP — The latest data released by the U.S. Drought Monitory Thursday shows that a moderate to exceptional drought covers 39.5% of the United States including Puerto Rico. Abnormal dryness and drought are currently affecting over 126 million people or about 40.7% of the population. Drought conditions in large areas of California and Colorado are helping to fuel the Read More…

Mekong dolphin population remains steady

Khmer Times — The Fisheries Administration and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) yesterday announced that an estimated 89 Irrawaddy dolphins live in the rivers of Cambodia, according to an official population survey. The survey  is from the 2020 report “The population of Mekong Irrawaddy dolphin in 2020 based on the Mark-Resight Models” which was released at the Fisheries Administration Read More…

Senators toughen stances against Pebble project

Alaska Journal of Commerce — After years of stressing process over policy, Alaska’s U.S. senators have both announced their opposition to development of the Pebble mine. Sen. Lisa Murkowski made her most definitive statement to-date against the massive Southwest Alaska mine plan Oct. 15 during an address to the Alaska Federation of Natives virtual annual convention, saying there is a Read More…

Columbia River Gorge management plan updated to protect salmon,…

The Oregonian — It took nature millions of years to form the Columbia River Gorge. It took the Columbia River Gorge Commission four years to come to an agreement on its “Gorge 2020” Management Plan. That’s pretty good from a geological perspective, but at times the process must have felt glacial to the 13 commission members who researched, listened, debated, argued and haggled before Read More…