California drought: State anticipates virtually no water deliveries…

San Francisco Chronicle — California water officials acknowledged Wednesday that another painful year of drought is likely, and warned the many communities receiving water from the State Water Project that they may get no water at all next year, except in cases of emergency. The record low 0% water allocation would leave parts of the state, including San Jose, much of the East Bay and Napa Read More…

Coho salmon run shatters record as steelhead numbers flop

East Oregonian — A record shattering number of coho salmon have made the long journey from their home streams to the Pacific Ocean and back. Nearly 24,000 coho salmon have passed through Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River — the last dam between the ocean and the Grande Ronde and Wallowa rivers. The prior record, set in 2014, saw 18,098 coho make their way past the Read More…

Climate change is making one of the world’s strongest currents flow…

Science Daily — Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and UC Riverside used satellite measurements of sea-surface height and data collected by the global network of ocean floats called Argo to detect a trend in Southern Ocean upper layer velocity that had been hidden to scientists until Read More…

Researchers are studying the unprecedented die-offs and surges in…

KGW 8 — A researcher studying the changes happening in the ocean off the Oregon coast called what he has seen unprecedented. There has been mass die-off of species critical to our ocean and our fisheries. Now an underwater mission is underway to find out what is happening. It all began back in 2013 with a record-breaking marine heatwave. It became known as the Read More…

Pacific Fisheries Must Modernize Management of Key Tuna Species

PEW Charitable Trusts — When the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) comes together virtually for its annual meeting 1-7 December, member countries need to take stock of how far they still need to go to modernize management of tuna. Seven years ago, member countries participating in the world’s largest tuna fishery agreed to implement harvest strategies for skipjack Read More…

Arizona, California, Nevada agree to new Colorado River agreement to…

The Central Square — Arizona’s water authorities are close to entering into a new pact with officials from Nevada and California they hope will restore water levels at Lake Mead and stave off future rationing requirements. A Tier 1 Colorado River water shortage begins in 2022, triggering a mandatory 512,000 acre-foot reduction to Arizona. The emergency stems from the Lake Mead reservoir Read More…

DWR Initiates $100 Million Funding Program to Rehabilitate Four Major…

Department of Water Resources — Today, the California Department of Water Resources initiated a $100 million funding program to restore capacity to portions of the California Aqueduct, San Luis Canal, Delta-Mendota Canal, and Friant-Kern Canal lost to land subsidence occurring during the last several decades. “Fixing these canals is an important foundational piece to ensure a reliable and Read More…

Scientists Are Running Out of Salmon to Study

Hakai Magazine — For years, Steven Cooke, a biologist at Carleton University in Ottawa, has been traveling to British Columbia to research Pacific salmon migrations. But on the west coast, salmon populations are in dire straits. Several of the populations Cooke studies, including those in the Fraser River, have crashed to the point that even taking a small number of fish for research would Read More…

Understanding how to build resilient fisheries

PhysOrg — A new decision-making framework designed by an international team of fisheries researchers can help fisheries bolster their ability to adapt to a warming world. The tool, said marine ecologist Jacob Eurich at UC Santa Barbara's National Center for Ecological Analysis & Synthesis (NCEAS), is meant to take a lot of the guesswork out of finding resilience in a time of climate Read More…

Here’s what brought king salmon back to Bay Area rivers

The Mercury News — Autumnal rain has sent a surge of Chinook salmon swimming up Bay Area creeks, a sharp reversal in fortune for an iconic species that has struggled after years of drought. A living link between our mountains and coast, the fish responded to late October’s fierce atmospheric river by rushing up the region’s once-parched rivers, say biologists, frequenting spots where Read More…