‘It will affect a lot of fish’: Incubating salmon eggs swept away…

Victoria Times Colonist — The heavy rainfall that turned rivers and creeks into raging waterways this week is expected to have a significant effect on salmon stocks for years to come. The swift water likely swept away incubating eggs and sent young salmon prematurely out to sea, destroyed critical gravel nesting sites and food sources, and hindered salmon that had yet to spawn, says Ian Read More…

MSA reauthorization debated in US House of Representatives

SeafoodSource — Two bills that would reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act received a hearing on Tuesday, 16 November, in the U.S. House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife. As U.S. Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska) said in a statement, the hearing was “one of contrasts,” as lawmakers reviewed his proposal and one by Subcommittee Read More…

This obscure laboratory Tahoe holds the answers to California’s…

SF Gate — At the top of Donner Summit, an old cabin rests in a thicket of tall trees. The structure is three stories tall, including the basement. Still, in the heaviest of winters, the snow drifts are deep enough to bury the front door, so the only way into the building is through a window on the top floor. The cabin is the home of an obscure laboratory, called the Central Sierra Snow Lab, Read More…

Four Central Valley groundwater plans fail to meet California…

Fresno Bee — Four groundwater plans in the Central Valley — including those for Westlands and Chowchilla water districts and the Merced and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins — do not show how they will protect water quality, keep drinking water wells from going dry or stop land from sinking further, according to the Department of Water Resources. In short, those plans earned “D’s” Read More…

Cambodia retains high level of biodiversity

The Phnom Penh Post — Cambodia is still recognised as a global leader in biodiversity with 6,149 species living in Cambodia on record to date, Ministry of Environment spokesman Neth Pheaktra said on November 19. “The number of species may even increase over time because new examples of Cambodia’s incredible degree of biodiversity may be discovered,” he said on his Facebook Read More…

Mekong Delta urgently needs climate change data: Conference

Vietnam Plus — A conference was held in the Mekong Delta city of Can Tho on November 18 to raise local young people's awareness of the importance of a database for environmental protection and climate change response. It was part of a project to build a communication programme to heighten awareness of the sustainable and climate-resilient development of the Mekong Delta in alignment with Read More…

Research locates cold-water areas crucial for fish survival

Methow Valley News — To humans, rivers in the Methow can seem pretty frigid, even in August. But for fish in the Methow, having cold water – really cold – is a matter of life and death. Aquatic ecologist John Crandall has been walking along the rivers in the Methow watershed – the Methow, Chewuch and Twisp – with an elongated thermometer, taking the water temperature as he Read More…

EPA Announces Next Steps in Process to Protect Bristol Bay Watershed…

EPA — Today, EPA announced a timeframe for the agency to consider new information available to determine next steps in the Bristol Bay Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 404(c) process for the Pebble Deposit (Pebble Mine) in Southwest Alaska. If a CWA 404(c) determination is finalized, it would help protect waters over the long term that are essential to commercial, subsistence, and recreational Read More…

Tribes ask for more support for salmon reintroduction to the Upper…

Northwest News Network — Native American tribes, who want help to continue reintroducing salmon above Grand Coulee Dam, asked for support to continue fish survival studies at Northwest Power and Conservation Council meetings this week. The tribes said they need support for donor stocks, rearing equipment and equipment for the acoustic and PIT tagging studies. The phased reintroduction has Read More…

In Colorado’s rivers, genetic research helps rainbow trout rebound

The Durango Herald — In the 1990s, rainbow trout in Colorado died. A lot of them. Millions of them. Whirling disease, an imported aquatic disease first discovered in Germany in 1893, left young trout swimming in circles. Nearly entire generations of rainbow trout died with kinks in their tails, catastrophic deformities from a nearly invisible parasite. The Colorado River in Grand County lost Read More…