Eating Endangered Species

The Manteca Bulletin – For years, the Bureau of Reclamation has tried to comply with the Endangered Species Act when it comes to protecting Chinook salmon and steelhead on the Stanislaus River by releasing more and more water. Legislation signed by President Obama in the waning days of his administration contains specific language requiring federal agencies to work with the South San Read More…

Study questions Stanislaus releases for salmon in fall

The Modesto Bee – A new study concludes that salmon have not benefited much from autumn water releases into the lower Stanislaus River. The research by the Fishbio consulting firm backs up claims by the Oakdale and South San Joaquin irrigation districts that the October releases are wasting water from New Melones Reservoir. The “pulse flows” are done on San Joaquin River Read More…

Study: Salmon don’t want too much water

The Modesto Bee – Salmon don’t read memos or get emails from the state Department of Water Resources, nor do they consult U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service instruction manuals. So how can they possibly know when it’s time to spawn? Over hundreds of thousands of years, salmon have learned to “read” signals that nature provides and only they truly understand. Those signals tell them Read More…

Study Casts Doubt on State’s Strategy

The Oakdale Leader – A scientific study covering 11 years of fish migration on the Stanislaus River underscores how simply sending more water downstream may not be doing endangered Chinook salmon any favors. Data shows there is a certain threshold for pulse flow volume that, if it is exceeded, doesn’t improve fish migration. It also points to other solutions such as the placement of the Read More…

Pulse Flows A Bit Fishy

Manteca Bulletin– A scientific study covering 11 years of fish migration on the Stanislaus River underscores how simply sending more water downstream may not be doing endangered Chinook salmon any favors. Data shows there is a certain threshold for pulse flow volume that if it is exceeded doesn’t improve fish migration. It also points to other solutions such as the placement of the rock Read More…

Congressional water bill great for the Stanislaus

Oakdale Leader – Two Central California irrigation district general managers say the comprehensive water bill passed Saturday by the U.S. Senate is good news for those who want to increase the salmon population in the Stanislaus River. Steve Knell of the Oakdale Irrigation District and Peter Rietkerk of the South San Joaquin Irrigation oversee agencies with senior water rights on the Read More…

SSJID: Look at the data

Manteca Bulletin – Spawning adult salmon on the Stanislaus River — the linchpin of what irrigation districts within the Northern San Joaquin Valley describe as a massive water grab proposal by the state — have increased by a factor of five since 2007 when work started on the 3,500-page State Water Control Board plan. Research data shows spawning numbers in 2015 were the 12th highest Read More…

Fourth Graders Begin to Examine Chinook

The Oakdale Leader – Things may seem a little fishy with Oakdale Joint Unified fourth graders these days, as teacher Krista Smith has begun making her migration to the varying school sites. Smith’s migration, however, doesn’t come by way of a fish snack cracker or a classroom pet, the salmon teacher spends two days of lecture time teaching the students about Chinook Salmon. As result of Read More…

Be weir-y: Valley, ag getting Water Board-ed by fish flow plans

The Modesto Bee – On the Stanislaus River west of Riverbank, a strange-looking contraption spans from bank to bank. A series of metal and plastic pipes, it is a weir that guides salmon and other fish through a boxlike piece where they can be counted via infrared and video technology. Similar weirs exist elsewhere on the Stanislaus and Tuolumne rivers, meaning the folks at Oakdale’s Read More…

Trout population down 75% in Stanislaus River

KCRA 3 News – KCRA three’s Linda Mumma reports on the possible response. Scientists are building a device to count the number of trout and salmon on the lower Stanislaus River. Directed through that funnel and they passed through that box where we set up a scanner that collects and infrared silhouette of every fish or other object that comes through and records pictures. Linda: this Read More…