Trawlers absorb 15 percent cut in halibut bycatch

Alaska DispatchBy Amanda CoyneJune 10, 2012After four days of contentious hearings, federal fisheries managers on Friday voted to reduce the bycatch of halibut caught by trawlers and certain other commercial fishermen in the Gulf of Alaska by 15 percent. That number is not as high as some sought, but several council members thought it was a good compromise.It’s the first time since 1989 that Read More…

Mega-bloom in Arctic Ocean astonishes scientists

Los Angeles TimesBy Amy HubbardJune 9, 2012Nothing new in the world? Nothing left to discover? NASA would beg to differ. The discovery of an “enormous, off-the-charts” bloom of microscopic marine plants in the Arctic has floored scientists.And it confirms, if nothing else, that there are things on this planet not yet seen — things that you “never, ever could have anticipated in a million Read More…

Illegal use of driftnets still a big problem in the Mediterranean

FISJune 6, 2012At a recent bilateral meeting in Brussels, high-ranking officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the European Commission (EC) discussed the problem of illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing, including the ongoing use of illegal driftnets in the Mediterranean. In September 2011, the US and the European Union (EU) signed a joint Read More…

NOAA to consider classifying herring species as ‘threatened’

Gloucester TimesBy Richard GainesJune 3, 2012 As part of the legal process of determining whether river herring, a close cousin of the commercially important Atlantic herring, qualifies for legal protection as a threatened species, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is launching a set of workshops in Gloucester on June 22. The protection was requested last August by the Natural Read More…

B.C. salmon farmers on ‘high alert’ for lethal virus

CBC NewsJune 2, 2012 B.C. salmon farmers say most of their operations have been untouched by a lethal fish virus, but the industry is "not out of the woods yet." Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, a highly contagious disease, first showed up more than two weeks ago in routine testing at a farm near Tofino, on the west coast of Vancouver Island, owned by Mainstream Canada. The Dixon Bay Read More…

The Problem of Overfishing

National Center for Policy AnalysisJune 1, 2012 While environmentalists have clamored to take on a number of issues in recent years, the substantial issues involved in overfishing have remained relatively quiet. Overfishing is international in scope, has been ongoing since the end of the Second World War, and is generally caused by bad government policy. And it poses real problems for the Read More…

Regulations help fish, and fishermen, recover in the U.S.

Monga BayBy Jeremy HanceMay 30, 2012Marine fish populations in the U.S. are generally recovering, according to a new report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Last year six fish populations reached healthy levels in the U.S., boosting the total number of fish populations that have recovered to 27 since 2000. The success is due to the implementation of science-based Read More…

Federal scientists disagree on why Atlantic cod struggled to recover

CanadaBy Randy BoswellMay 3, 2012Two teams of federal fisheries scientists are clashing over their interpretations of why Atlantic cod struggled to recover following the population's devastating collapse in the early 1990s, raising fresh questions about the best way to sustain the resource in the future.Less than a year ago, a high-profile study published by Department of Fisheries and Oceans Read More…

Sustainable fisheries fund launched

Fish News EUMay 2, 2012The Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) has announced the formation of a new fund to support fisheries improvement projects (FIPs) around the world. The fund will be used to: Work with producers and the seafood supply chain to initiate the development of more FIPs in critical areas. Train producers and exporters on how to lead and report on their FIPs, and Read More…

Killer fish looked half shark, half tuna

Discovery NewsBy Jennifer Viegas May 2, 2012The appropriately named Rebellatrix, a shark-like predatory fish that partly resembled tuna, terrorized ocean dwellers 240 million years ago.Rebellatrix, meaning the rebel coelacanth, is described in the latest issue of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Coelacanths are iconic fishes today, well known as living fossils. Coelacanths are thought of Read More…