Dogs help sniff out aquatic invasive species in Yellowstone, Glacier,…

KRTV – National parks are working to “sniff out” a solution to aquatic invasive species, and Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks are teaming up with some of the best noses in the business to make a difference. Tobias, a yellow lab, will hit the trails of Yellowstone Friday to assist in aquatic invasive species (AIS) boat inspections. He’ll sniff out zebra and quagga mussels, Read More…

Forward Progress to Reactivate our Floodplains in the Sacramento…

Northern California Water Association – The Northern California Water Association recently joined a broad coalition of conservation organizations, landowners, local governments, water suppliers and academic institutions to applaud the Governor and the Legislature for including nearly $100 million in the 2019-2020 State Budget for important investments to improve public safety, enhance water Read More…

Sport fishers stage floating protest over chinook salmon fishing ban

Times Colonist – Sport fishermen, guides and their supporters floated in their boats Monday near Ogden point protesting a ban on fishing for chinook salmon. Darren Wright, co-owner of Island Outfitters and a fishing guide, said the protesting sport fishermen are asking for the right to catch only one hatchery-bred chinook salmon per day. Hatchery-bred fish can be recognized by the lack of Read More…

Judge orders state DEQ to do more to shield salmon streams

Portland Tribune – U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernández is ordering the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to do more to protect salmon streams harmed by logging operations. He ruled in June in a clean water lawsuit filed by environmentalists that has been winding through the courts since 2012. The plaintiffs claimed the DEQ is not doing enough to protect salmon threatened by Read More…

Record warm water blamed for salmon deaths

Juneau Empire – Record-high temperatures in Alaska are believed to be the cause of salmon deaths in the western part of the state. Water temperatures near Bethel broke into the low 70s earlier this week, the highest river temperature ever recorded there, Bethel-based KYUK reported. Those conditions were part of a heat wave that swept the state. “Essentially, what could happen is Read More…

Climate change threatens California freshwater fish. We can do…

The Sacramento Bee – Fish die-offs in freshwater lakes are an increasing threat in California, and experts say climate change is to blame. Researchers from UC Davis and Reed College in Portland, Ore., found a strong link between fish deaths in freshwater lakes in Wisconsin and hot summers. They predict that fish die-offs will double by 2050 and quadruple by 2100 in Wisconsin. Andrew Read More…

First Reintroduced Salmon Return to California Rivers in a Critical…

NOAA Fisheries – California salmon reintroduced to their historic habitat as juveniles are, for the first time, returning to their home rivers to spawn. Their journey home demonstrates that fish reintroductions can successfully return Golden State salmon to restored rivers and streams in an important step toward their recovery. More than 25 threatened spring-run Chinook salmon have Read More…

Bay anglers score best catch numbers in a lifetime

San Francisco Chronicle – Anglers wait their whole lives for the chance at hooking the numbers of fish that are coming out of the bay and Pacific right now. Striped bass and halibut, salmon and rockfish — the catch counts are once in a lifetime. Out of Berkeley, the boat Pacific Dream recently brought in 48 striped bass up to 10 pounds, 34 halibut up to 15 pounds among 24 anglers — plus Read More…

Projects to help fish: Salmon recovery efforts highlighted in Yakima…

Yakima Herald – While it’s hardly fixed every problem or brought back historic populations, Yakima Basin Fish and Wildlife Recovery Board Executive Director Alex Conley said it’s an example of positive steps in the region. “What we saw in Cowiche Creek is a lot like what we’ve seen on probably 10 different creeks through the basin,” Conley said. “You could tell a similar Read More…

Officials predict poor sockeye return

The Lewiston Tribune – This year’s return of Snake River sockeye salmon, Idaho’s most imperiled fish, is lagging far behind the 10-year average and isn’t expected to improve. Through Monday, just eight sockeye had been counted at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River in Washington compared to a 10-year average of 317. The fish are listed as endangered and have been struggling Read More…