Deep-sea squid breaks off its own arms to confuse predators

SmithsonianAugust 3, 2012Octopoteuthis deletron, a species of squid found deep in the cold waters of the Pacific Ocean, has many natural predators: elephant seals, giant grenadier fish and the mysterious Perrin’s beaked whale.To protect itself, the squid has developed a a rather unusual defensive mechanism, recently discovered by cephalopod researcher Stephanie Bush of the University of Rhode Read More…

Researcher’s fish-eye view could offer insights for human vision

Medical X PressBy Elizabeth K. GardnerAugust 2, 2012 A Purdue University student's research project related to zebrafish eye development could lead to a better understanding of vision problems that affect billions of people worldwide.Zeran Li, as an undergraduate student in biological sciences, led a research team that uncovered an enzyme's role in the regulation of eye size in the fish. If the Read More…

Melanoma-like lesions seen in Australian trout for first time

The Huffington PostAugust 1, 2012The first case of skin cancer in a wild marine fish population looks eerily similar to the melanoma that plagues humans, researchers report today.Coral trout living on Australia's Great Barrier Reef are directly beneath the Antarctic ozone hole, the world's largest, which is the result of the depletion of ozone in the atmosphere that normally protects humans from Read More…

Global warming could help pesky fish pest

ABC ScienceBy Anna SallehAugust 1, 2012Global warming could advantage one pesky marine species while disadvantaging its predator, a new study suggests.The study, of the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) and its predator, the Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata), is published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. "Mosquitofish are very aggressive - they eat lots of Read More…

It’s the world’s slowest shark — hang on, it’ll be here in a…

MSNBCBy Jennifer ViegasJuly 31, 2012Greenland sharks are the slowest known sharks, according to a new study that found these sharks move through the water at only about a mile per hour.The study, which will be published in the September issue of the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, also finds that the sharks are the slowest known fish, when body size is factored in. Greenland Read More…

Male sea bass proportion sought to be boosted

FISBy Analia MuriasJuly 25, 2012A team of researchers from the Centre for Marine Sciences (CCMAR) at the University of Algarve is intending to artificially balance the sex ratio of the sea bass, to inhibit the formation of males.The main goal scientists have is to boost the production system of this species in Europe and worldwide. While in nature the sexes are minimally balanced between males Read More…

Study to examine how mining and climate affect native fish

PhysOrgJuly 20, 2012Researchers at The University of Western Australia will investigate how native freshwater fish in northwest Australia are dealing with changes to their habitat caused by climate change and mining.Chief investigator Dr. Pauline Grierson, from UWA's School of Plant Biology, said the inter-disciplinary study would examine the biological adaptation and ecological resilience of Read More…

Study explores potential of spatial planning to manage fisheries

FIS By Natalia RealJuly 19, 2012Researchers are trying to determine the best ways to use and refine spatial planning including marine protected areas (MPAs) to manage fisheries and other ocean resources.A new paper published in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this month describes research conducted by a team headed by University of California, Santa Read More…

Alaskan salmon evolve along with the climate

The New York TimesBy Nicholas BakalarJuly 16, 2012Researchers have suspected that temperature-driven changes in migration and reproduction behaviors — which have happened in many species — may be evidence of natural selection at work. Now there is genetic evidence to confirm the hypothesis.For their study, published online last week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the scientists Read More…

Researchers Find Evidence of Genetic Change in Salmon in Response to…

Environmental ProtectionJuly 13, 2012 Because the gradual increase in temperatures worldwide is still relatively new, researchers have had difficulty in finding examples of genetic changes in organisms that are adapting to the warmer temperatures. Instead they have seen examples of phenotypic plasticity, which is where animals make adaptive changes based on existing conditions that are not Read More…