Researchers identify behavioral adaptations that may help Antarctic…

Science Daily — Yet dipping below the waves, the Southern Ocean teems with biodiversity: vibrant swaths of sea ice algae and cyanobacteria, swarming krill and crustaceans, bristling kelp forests, gigantic polar sea spiders and sponges, whale pods, and abundant Antarctic fish fauna. These fishes play a vital role in the Southern Ocean's food web of 9,000 known marine species, yet their subzero Read More…

Disrupting trout body clocks could damage health, Bangor University…

North Wales Chronicle — Keeping fish under constant light – often used by fish farms to enhance growth or control reproduction – disrupts these daily rhythms and leads to increased susceptibility to parasites. This work, carried out by researchers at Bangor, Cardiff and Aberystwyth Universities, published in the journal Microbiome, demonstrates how important understanding the Read More…

Genes Reveal How Some Rockfish Live Up to 200 Years

Scientific American — Few groups of animals encapsulate the extremes of longevity more than fish. While coral reef pygmy govies survive for less than ten weeks, Greenland sharks can endure more than 500 years. So when a team of biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, wanted to explore the genetics of aging, they grabbed their fishing gear. Their preferred catch was rockfish. Read More…

Effects of fasting and temperature on the biological parameters,…

Science Direct — Abstract We investigated the effects of temperature and fasting on chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) at different life stages. In the first stage, fish were reared at 13 °C (198.5 ± 34.6 g) or 17 °C (218.3 ± 47.6 g) and fasted for 27 and 26 days, respectively. In the second stage, fish reared at 13 °C (481.8 ± 54.3 g) and 17 °C Read More…

Simon Frasier University Study Determines That Salmon Need Trees

Fisherman's News — A new study by researchers at British Columbia’s Simon Fraser University concludes that the impacts of logging may take a surprisingly long time to manifest themselves, but that logging does indeed have big impacts on the well-being of fish. The study, led by Simon Fraser’s Kyle Wilson, looks at the successes and failures of five species of salmon in the Keogh River on Read More…

Indigenous sex-selective salmon harvesting demonstrates pre-contact…

Nature.com — Abstract To gain insight into pre-contact Coast Salish fishing practices, we used new palaeogenetic analytical techniques to assign sex identifications to salmonid bones from four archaeological sites in Burrard Inlet (Tsleil-Waut), British Columbia, Canada, dating between about 2300–1000 BP (ca. 400 BCE–CE 1200). Our results indicate that male chum salmon (Oncorhynchus Read More…

Genetic analysis uncovers shared evolutionary history of fish fins…

NewsWise — All vertebrates have the same basic body plan: head, spine, four appendages. Those appendages vary greatly in size, shape, and function, of course — from fins to wings, arms, and legs — but a new genetic analysis shows that genes that control development at the ends of the appendages share a deep evolutionary history. In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the Read More…

The natural world: A brief history lesson in salmon, trout names

East Oregonian — Imagine yourself as a naturalist, two centuries ago, when up to 20 million Pacific salmon and steelhead returned annually to spawn in the Columbia River Basin. Several species of resident trout also ranged throughout the Columbia and Snake rivers and their tributaries at the time. How would you describe these strange and wonderful fish when only one species, the Read More…

Microalgae’s carbon capture abilities confirmed in new study

The Fish Site — A study conducted by the Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) at the University of Aveiro (UA) found that photosynthetic organisms like microalgae can remove thousands of tonnes of atmospheric carbon each year. This finding highlights the need to preserve the tidal estuaries and ecosystems where microalgae live. Published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Read More…

Study finds fish rubbing up against their predators — sharks

Science Daily — While rubbing up against a shark sounds like a risky move if you're a fish, a collaborative research team led by the University of Miami (UM) Shark Research and Conservation Program at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that this behavior is frequent, widespread, and could play a previously unappreciated important ecological role for aquatic Read More…