UC: Study shows Calif. must value ecosystem services

Western Farm Press – The ecosystem services of landscapes in California are essential to the state's future, but many people take them for granted. In addition to direct economic outputs, working landscapes – farms, rangelands, forests and fisheries, to name a few – sequester carbon, capture water, support wildlife, offer picturesque views and make space for hiking, skiing, boating Read More…

Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters…

UC Santa Cruz – The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 Read More…

Communicating science with art: how are fish and us alike?

Great Lakes Echo – We like fish. And we are like fish. Two Michigan State University scientists recently displayed that similarity through art. Ingo Braasch and Julia Ganz, researchers at the university’s Department of Integrative Biology, compiled videos and photos taken during their research into artwork named “Life in Technicolor: The Art of Fish Development and Evolution.” Read More…

Plans to save species from extinction are ignoring climate change

New Scientist – Climate change is a threat to hundreds of species of endangered animals, but conservationists aren’t taking this into account in their plans to save those at risk. That’s the finding of Aimee Delach at conservation organisation Defenders of Wildlife, based in Washington DC. She and her colleagues analysed conservation plans for 459 of the animals listed as endangered Read More…

Study links Asian carp with Mississippi River fish drop

Phys.Org – Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, adding evidence to fears about the invader's threat to native species, according to a new study. Analysis of nearly 20 years of population data suggests the carp are out-competing fish prized by anglers, such as yellow perch, bluegill, and black and white crappie, the Read More…

Bigger doesn’t mean better for hatchery-released salmon

Science Daily – Fish permeate the culture of the Pacific Northwest (PNW). In particular, the iconic salmon has been an important part of the region for thousands of years, from ancient Native American trade routes and legends to modern fishing and sporting. In the area of the Salish Sea -- inland waterways including Puget Sound, the Strait of Georgia, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca -- the Read More…

The Ecological Cost of Mosquito Net Fishing

Modern Farmer – Unable to afford fishing nets, fishermen in poor countries have been using anti-malaria mosquito nets to catch fish and feed their families. This practice has alarmed researchers who worry the misuse of the nets will pose risks to health, devastate ecosystems and threaten food security. Until now, experts have only been able to speculate about the impacts this kind of Read More…

Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web

Science Daily – The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are taking place in phytoplankton populations that form the base of the ocean's food web, a new international study finds. "The change we observed in tuna, which are near the top of the marine food web, reflects profound changes in physiology or Read More…

Where plastic outnumbers fish by seven to one

BBC News – Plastic is building up in the areas of the ocean where fish feed and grow, according to research. A study found bits of plastic outnumber baby fish by seven to one in nursery waters off Hawaii. It appears that the same ocean processes that concentrate prey for juvenile fish also accumulate floating plastics. There is growing evidence that plastic is being ingested by marine life, Read More…

Antidepressants make shrimps see the light

Science Daily – Rising levels of antidepressants in coastal waters could change sea-life behaviour and potentially damage the food-chain, according to a new study. Research into the behaviour of shrimps exposed to the antidepressant fluoxetine, showed that their behaviour is dramatically affected. The shrimps are five times more likely to swim toward the light instead of away from it -- Read More…