Protecting redundancy in the food web helps ensure ecological…

UC Santa Barbara – In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the U.S. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater. Fueled by abnormally hot ocean temperatures, sea star wasting disease ravaged these echinoderms from Alaska to Mexico. The condition, still not fully understood, wiped out a significant marine predator, the sunflower star. The Read More…

Research Helps Survival of Released Fish

Coastal Review Online – After hooking a fish, reeling it in from the sea floor and posing for a photo, there’s a fairly good chance a recreational fisher might release their catch back into the ocean. The chance of that fish’s survival is less clear. Rising numbers of released fish, combined with an uncertain likelihood of their survival, has made it more challenging to estimate how Read More…

New world map of fish genetic diversity

ETH Zurich – An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. Their research produced a map that will serve as a tool in improving the protection of species and genetic diversity in the future. In a population of animals or plants, genetic diversity can decline much more quickly than Read More…

What do Kokanee eat? Ongoing Wallowa Lake study aims to find out

Wallowa County Chieftain – An ongoing study of Wallowa Lake's kokanee and their food sources aims to improve lives of kokanee, and also help fisheries biologists understand if the lake has the resources to support reintroduction of sockeye. It might be easy for the casual observer to think Northwest fishery management is all about the big stuff: big rivers, big dams, big projects, big Read More…

Alaska’s national forests contribute 48 million salmon a year – a…

US Forest Service – Alaska’s Tongass and Chugach National Forests, which contain some of the world’s largest remaining tracts of intact temperate rainforest, contribute an average of 48 million salmon a year to the state’s commercial fishing industry, a new USDA Forest Service-led study has found. The average value of these “forest fish” when they are brought back to the dock is Read More…

Study: Toxic Elements Around Salton Sea Could Adversely Affect Nearby…

KPBS – More than dust-filled air could be plaguing residents around the quickly evaporating Salton Sea in Imperial Valley. University of California, Riverside research shows toxic aerosols could also be filling the air. The problem has to do with agricultural fertilizer in the Salton Sea wetland area. UC Riverside toxicologist Sabbir Ahmed and first-author on the study says the fertilizer Read More…

Hunting is declining, creating a crisis for conservation funding

The Seattle Times – They settled, watchfully, into position — a retired couple armed with a long-nose camera and three men with shotguns. Tom Stoeri balanced the hefty lens on his half-open car window, waiting to capture the Canada geese as they huddled on the frozen lake, fluttering up in occasional agitation before they launched into flight. A little more than a mile away, John Read More…

Family matters for world’s second biggest fish

University of Aberdeen – The world's second biggest fish - the basking shark - prefers to travel with family to familiar feeding sites, according to a new study led by the University of Aberdeen. The research, published today in Scientific Reports sheds new light on the migration routes of the sharks and outlines their vulnerability to environmental change. Basking sharks can grow more Read More…

Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’ fish drawings

Vet Candy – Historical biodiversity data is being obtained from museum specimens, literature, classic monographs and old photographs, yet those sources can be damaged, lost or not completely adequate. That brings us to the need of finding additional, even if non-traditional, sources. Biodiversity observations are made not only by researchers, but also by citizens, though rather often these Read More…

Researchers Aim to Cure Valley’s Salty Soil With $2.5M Grant From…

UC Merced – California’s Central Valley has some of the most productive agricultural land in the world, but the accumulation of salt from irrigation water is decreasing crop productivity and threatening the industry’s long-term sustainability. A new project out of UC Merced — funded by a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation — seeks to address this problem by Read More…