Researchers Look to Wetlands to Increase Delta Water Quality

UC Merced – UC Merced Professor Peggy O’Day hopes to improve water quality in the California Delta by studying local wetlands. O’Day is leading a new three-year study of Merced County wetlands that drain into the San Joaquin River and eventually the Delta. “The Delta is sort of the heart and lungs of Northern California,” said O’Day, a geochemistry professor, founding faculty Read More…

Millions of seabirds rely on discarded fish

University of Exeter – Millions of scavenging seabirds survive on fish discarded by North Sea fishing vessels, new research shows. University of Exeter scientists estimate that 267,000 tonnes of fish was discarded in the North Sea in 2010 – enough to feed 3.45 million birds. This discard figure is down from almost 510,000 tonnes – enough for an estimated 5.66 million birds – in Read More…

Machine learning helps accelerate NOAA fish surveys

KTUU – Artificial intelligence is changing one of the most tedious of biologists' tasks: fish counting. With advances in underwater camera technology and machine-learning-based image processing, biologists with NOAA Fisheries have been able to complete some fish surveys in a fraction of the amount of time previously needed. The survey data is incorporated into stock assessments, which Read More…

Study shows invasive blue catfish can tolerate high salinities

William & Mary – A new study by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science warns that blue catfish — an invasive species in several Chesapeake Bay tributaries — tolerate salinities higher than most freshwater fishes, and thus may be able to expand their range downstream into mainstem Chesapeake waters, and from there into new bay tributaries and even Read More…

New detection system tracks steelhead

The Challis Messenger – The Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s wild steelhead monitoring infrastructure has been improved with the addition of a fish-detection system in Marsh Creek, a tributary of the Middle Fork Salmon River. It allows Fish and Game biologists to monitor wild steelhead as they move around Idaho. the fish have been fitted with passive integrated transponders which can Read More…

Use of neonicotinoids on rice paddies linked to fishery collapse in…

Phys.Org – A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found what they describe as compelling evidence of two fisheries collapsing due to use of neonicotinoid pesticides by nearby rice farmers. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their study of fishery water quality data over two decades and what they learned from it. Read More…

Water Yield from Forest Thinning Depends on How, Where and How Much

UC Merced – Even a little forest management significantly increases water runoff in the Central Sierra Nevada and other semi-arid regions, while drier forests need more extensive treatments, according to a new study published recently in the journal Ecohydrology. “The result is more runoff to downstream water users,” said UC Merced Professor Martha Conklin , who led the Read More…

Science to action: Research informs management in the San Francisco…

Sea Grant – New findings on fish genetics, risk management, wastewater runoff, climate change impacts and more will help inform management in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin/San Francisco Bay Delta. The research findings are a result of eight two-year projects by PhD students and postdocs, with funding from the Delta Stewardship Council and coordination of the fellowship program by Read More…

UW Research finds that trout habitat improvements benefit native fish

Oil City News – Research out of the University of Wyoming has found that improvement to trout habitat can benefit native fish. “Habitat improvements in the Laramie River intended to boost the brown trout fishery also have benefited native nongame fish,” UW said in an Oct. 25 release. “That finding is good news for anglers, the introduced brown trout they pursue and native nongame Read More…

Theory explains biological reasons that force fish to move poleward

Phys.Org – The Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory, known as GOLT, explains the biological reasons that force fish, particularly larger or older ones, to move poleward when the waters in their habitats heat-up due to climate change. In a paper published in Mediterranean Marine Science, Daniel Pauly, the author of the theory and the principal investigator of the Sea Around Usinitiative at the Read More…