“Blob” Research Reveals Environmental Effects That Shut Down…

NOAA Fisheries – An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales. This put the region’s most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows. The findings reflect a new management challenge brought about by a changing climate, recovering whale populations, and fishing Read More…

Researchers develop an app for tracking trade of endangered fish

Massive Science – The Napoleon, or humphead, wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus), is a giant and ornately decorated reef fish which can grow over 6 feet long and live for over 30 years. Unfortunately, these rare fish are a coveted delicacy in live fish markets throughout Asia, and the high volume at which they are traded has landed them a spot on the CITES endangered species list. To keep them Read More…

The world’s freshwater giants are dying

The Seattle Times – Some of the most astonishing creatures on Earth hide deep in rivers and lakes: giant catfish weighing more than 600 pounds, stingrays the length of Volkswagen Beetles, 6-foot-long trout that can swallow a mouse whole. There are about 200 species of so-called freshwater megafauna, but compared with their terrestrial and marine counterparts, they are poorly studied Read More…

Researchers tap salmon DNA to decode marine mysteries

Canada's National Observer – Looking back, Christoph Deeg admits he didn’t know what he was getting into when he accepted a job on a high-seas expedition in the dead of winter on the RV Professor Kaganovskiy. At the time, the 33-year-old biologist and genomics specialist was fresh off completing his PhD, and he jumped at the chance to join 20 other scientists from five Pacific Rim Read More…

Fisheries Management Is Actually Working, Global Analysis Shows

Science Blog – Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance. Effective management appears to be the main reason these stocks are at sustainable levels or successfully rebuilding. That is the main finding of an international project led by the University of Washington to compile and analyze data from Read More…

Fisheries management is actually working, global analysis shows

UW News – Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance. Effective management appears to be the main reason these stocks are at sustainable levels or successfully rebuilding. That is the main finding of an international project led by the University of Washington to compile and analyze data from Read More…

Study: Reassessing impacts of ocean acidification on fish behaviour

Tunise Soir – Ocean acidification due to rising CO2 levels may have a negligible impact on critical behaviours of coral reef fishes, reports a paper published in Nature. The findings, which challenge previous research, are the results of a multi-year, multi-species project aimed at assessing the impact of ocean acidification on coral reef fishes. By the end of the century, the Read More…

Take It or Leave It

The Current – The oil platforms off the Santa Barbara coast are a familiar sight to local residents. The structures tower above the ocean surface like industrial factories. But below the water, the rigs are like high-rise apartment buildings, providing homes to a vibrant community of sea life. Of California’s 23 federal offshore platforms, many are nearing the end of their lives, and Read More…

New assessment method reveals many fish stocks are in urgent need of…

Sea Around Us – A newly developed method for assessing how abundant fish populations are and how fishing is affecting them revealed that several fish stocks across oceans are far below internationally agreed minimum levels and in urgent need of sustainable management. The methodology, known as Abundance Maximum Sustainable Yields or AMSY, was developed by an international team of Read More…

DNA barcodes help identify fish eggs and inform conservation

Massive Science – Fish are economically and ecologically important in the Gulf of Mexico, yet their stocks are decreasing due to overfishing. One major way that we can help protect fish is to protect the habitats where they reproduce. But in order to do that, we first have to find out where they reproduce. One way to find these spawning habitats is by using floating fish eggs. Before Read More…