California drought: State anticipates virtually no water deliveries…

San Francisco Chronicle — California water officials acknowledged Wednesday that another painful year of drought is likely, and warned the many communities receiving water from the State Water Project that they may get no water at all next year, except in cases of emergency. The record low 0% water allocation would leave parts of the state, including San Jose, much of the East Bay and Napa Read More…

Arizona, California, Nevada agree to new Colorado River agreement to…

The Central Square — Arizona’s water authorities are close to entering into a new pact with officials from Nevada and California they hope will restore water levels at Lake Mead and stave off future rationing requirements. A Tier 1 Colorado River water shortage begins in 2022, triggering a mandatory 512,000 acre-foot reduction to Arizona. The emergency stems from the Lake Mead reservoir Read More…

DWR Initiates $100 Million Funding Program to Rehabilitate Four Major…

Department of Water Resources — Today, the California Department of Water Resources initiated a $100 million funding program to restore capacity to portions of the California Aqueduct, San Luis Canal, Delta-Mendota Canal, and Friant-Kern Canal lost to land subsidence occurring during the last several decades. “Fixing these canals is an important foundational piece to ensure a reliable and Read More…

California remains in precarious water predicament

KTVU — October was a welcome water wonderland, but November was pretty much a dry bust for the Golden States. Was California's wet October a sucker punch to the state's all important reservoirs? "Historically, 1976, which was historically dry, started off with a wet October, so we're not counting our chickens yet," said East Bay Municipal Utilities District Public Read More…

A future of little to no snow in the western mountains will stress…

Courthouse News Service — The U.S. will need to make some serious changes to its water supply strategies as Earth’s climate continues to warm and snowpack in the country's western mountains becomes much harder to come by in the coming decades, according to a new study. In America’s long and often strained history of managing its water infrastructure massive amounts of water from Read More…

Water restrictions coming to Bakersfield to address drought

The Bakersfield Californian — Bakersfield’s two largest water providers will soon implement new restrictions to head off the potentially dire impacts of an extended drought. On Dec. 14, the city of Bakersfield and California Water Service plan to limit the days customers can use water for outdoor landscaping. Other restrictions, like no longer automatically serving drinking Read More…

Snowpack in California’s Sierra Nevada could disappear in just 25…

San Francisco Chronicle — As the climate continues to warm, more and more of the snow falling on California’s mountains will be replaced by rain. Already in recent decades, the snow season has shrunk by a month, according to one estimate, while snow levels have moved upward by 1,200 feet, according to another. Scientists and water managers say that at some point California’s snowpack Read More…

Snow cover critical for revegetation after fires

Western Farmer-Stockman — How much and how long a severely burned Pacific Northwest mountain landscape stays blanketed in winter snow is a key factor in the return of vegetation, research by Oregon State University and the University of Nevada, Reno shows. Published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, the findings are important because the severity and frequency of Read More…

State plans action to improve groundwater supply

The Press — Advocates for the environment hailed the state’s recent decision to implement updated water-flow standards in the San Joaquin River, but what the move will mean for Sacramento River flows remains to be seen. The action taken by the California Natural Resources Agency (CNRA) and the California Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) ended the voluntary agreement Read More…

Why can’t we just move water to solve a drought?

KTLA — Have you seen the U.S. Drought Monitor’s map lately? It’s not good. Especially for one half of the country. More than 98% of the Western United States is experiencing drought. In the Northeast, it’s only about 15% of the land under a drought. In the Southeast it’s even lower, at 8%. So if there’s plenty of water in reservoirs to the East, why not just move around Read More…