Solving a statistical nightmare

The Harvard Gazette – Something odd happened in the oceans in the early 20th century. The North Atlantic and Northeast Pacific appeared to warm twice as much as the global average, while the Northwest Pacific cooled over several decades. Atmospheric and oceanic models have had trouble accounting for these differences in temperature changes, leading to a mystery in climate science: Why did Read More…

New study maps out how the world’s fisheries are interconnected

Seafood Source – A new study published in the journal Science reveals that the world’s marine fisheries form a single global network – linked by transnational flows of fish larvae – rather than existing as discrete groups. Researchers from the United States and the United Kingdom believe that their work could lead to greater international cooperation in the way fish stocks are Read More…

Humans May Be Accidentally Geoengineering the Oceans

Scientific American – As the saying goes, what goes up must come down—and, as it turns out, a lot of what goes up comes down into the world’s oceans. Iron particles, released by human industrial activities, are one example of a pollutant that goes into the atmosphere and eventually settles into the sea. Now, new research suggests that human-emitted iron is accumulating in the ocean Read More…

Scientists implant noisemakers in chinook, deploy tracking array on…

The Seattle Times – Flashing silver, the salmon loomed up from the deep, hooked and thrashing. With a tug, scientists hauled it aboard and quickly dunked the fish in a cooler full of anesthetizing knockout potion: They had plans for this big chinook. This fish was going places, and they wanted to know where. For as long as there have been fishermen and fish, people have wanted to know Read More…

The Benefits of Marine Protected Areas Spill into Neighboring Waters

Hakai Magazine – When California implemented a string of marine protected areas (MPAs) about a decade ago, one of its goals was to bolster the number of fish available to recreational and commercial fishers. The state created a network of protected reserves, occupying about 18 percent of the state’s waters, that are close enough together that fish born in one no-fishing area can readily Read More…

MIT professor renews warning about the possibility of mass extinction…

Boston Globe – An MIT professor who theorizes that a mass extinction could begin in the ocean by the end of the century due to climate change has more bad news: Once it begins, it could take on a life of its own. “It’s difficult to know how things will end up given what’s happening today. But we’re probably close to a critical threshold,” Daniel Rothman said this week in a statement Read More…

New study shows hundreds of sharks and rays entangled in discarded…

The Print – The seas are awash with plastic waste more than ever and choking marine life at an unprecedented pace. A recent study found reports of as many as 1,116 sharks and rays entangled in plastic items in the oceans – including the Atlantic, Pacific and the Indian. Among other things, discarded fishing nets, ropes and gears are mostly to be blamed for the ghastly deformities seen Read More…

This Upcoming Full Moon Means Something Special For Sharks

Forbes – Every July under the light of the full moon something magical happens in the French Polynesia island of Fakarava. Grouper come together in a colossal aggregation in the south pass of the island, an atoll in the Tuamotu Archipelago, to spawn. Biologists believe that numbers could surpass 20,000 fish and may be the largest known aggregation of large reef fish. In 2014, Laurent Ballesta Read More…

Scientists predict ‘dead zone’ the size of Massachusetts in Gulf…

FOX 35 – There's a "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico where the water holds too little oxygen to sustain marine life, and scientists are predicting one of the largest in history this summer. The gulf's dead zone, called the hypoxic zone, is primarily caused by excess nutrient pollution from humans, particularly nitrogen and phosphorous, which run off into the Mississippi River and into the Read More…

Largest Seaweed Bloom Recorded Impressively Spans the Length of the…

Interesting Engineering – A huge mass of floating seaweed spanning from the West African coast to the Gulf of Mexico has officially been declared the largest clump of seaweed in the world. This was recorded in June 2018. The seaweed spans across the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea and could become the norm according to scientists. The study of the seaweed mass was published in Read More…