Commercial Fishing Could Receive Subsidies for Losses Due to Offshore…

NBC — Nine states along the East Coast that are frontrunners for American offshore wind farms over the next decade are in talks with the federal government about ways to mitigate revenue losses for commercial fishing once the farms are built out. Commercial fishing industries in the Mid-Atlantic have long been opposed to offshore wind farms, which coastal states and the Biden administration Read More…

Climate change warrants greater fisheries conservation, NGO says

Cook Island News — Environmental factors, including climate change, are affecting catches for local fishermen and more needs to be done to ensure Pacific tuna stocks remain healthy, says an official with the World Wildlife Fund. While acknowledging the reported healthy state of regional tuna stocks, climate change necessitates more conservative catch limits, says a fisheries expert with Read More…

Why big fish thrive in protected oceans

University of Western Australia — Big fish are harder to find in areas sprawling with human activity, unless you’re looking in no-take marine reserves, according to a new study led by marine scientists at The University of Western Australia. The study, published in Conservation Biology, is one of the largest of its kind and assessed the body size of fish from around Australia, using Read More…

The surprising ways sharks keep the ocean healthy

National Geographic — Sharks, among the fiercest predators in the ocean, are also some of the most vulnerable. Three-quarters of open-ocean shark and ray species are threatened with extinction, primarily because of overfishing. For years, scientists have warned that these plummeting numbers could be catastrophic. Because sharks are top predators that help keep the food web in check, it would Read More…

Most Invasive Marine Species Swim Under the Radar

Hakai Magazine — The first signs of trouble came in the mid-2000s. A strikingly beautiful, highly venomous animal called the lionfish—first spotted outside its native range in the Indo-Pacific in the 1980s—now seemed to be in every reef, mangrove forest, and seagrass meadow in the Caribbean. The fish quickly became the face of what the International Union for Conservation of Nature has Read More…

Reps. Huffman, Case Introduce Legislation to Reauthorize…

Environmental Defense Fund — Today, Reps. Jared Huffman (D-CA) and Ed Case (D-Hawaii) introduced the Sustaining America’s Fisheries for the Future Act. The bill reauthorizes and strengthens the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, or MSA — the nation’s primary statute governing the management of U.S. fisheries in federal marine waters. The MSA was originally signed Read More…

Ingenious Ocean Microbes Team Up Brilliantly To Gather Food When…

SciTechDaily — What’s a hungry marine microbe to do when the pickings are slim? It must capture nutrients – nitrogen, phosphorus, or iron – to survive, yet in vast expanses of the ocean, nutrients are extremely scarce. And the stakes are high: Marine microbial communities drive many of the elemental cycles that sustain all life on Earth. One ingenious solution to this challenge is Read More…

The Moon ‘Wobble’ Isn’t New. What’s New is the Impact of…

KQED — So, about that moon wobble … Last week, NASA published a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change that found rising sea levels plus higher tides caused by an oscillation in the moon's orbit will dramatically increase the number of sunny day floods experienced in U.S. coastal communities. The Bay Area is one of the most populous and flood-threatened shorelines of the Read More…

Low oxygen levels off Northwest coast raise fears of marine ‘dead…

OPB — Low oxygen levels measured off the coast of Oregon and Washington are raising fears of large “dead zones” that could wipe out crabs and bottom-dwelling fish within. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, announced Wednesday that researchers have detected unseasonably low oxygen levels in a large area off the Pacific coast. Year after year of low oxygen levels Read More…

‘It’s gross’: A summer of red tides piles up 600 tons of dead…

New York Times — The stench hits first, uncomfortable at best and gag-inducing at worst. Then comes a small tickle in the back of the throat that won’t go away. But it is the dead fish that are the real mark of a red tide. Wednesday on Coquina Beach, south of St. Petersburg, Fla., carcasses were scattered across the shore in small clumps. “The smell, the dead fish, it’s gross,” said Read More…