A tiny fish is on the brink of extinction. Does it matter that…

WHYY — California’s tiny delta smelt is not a terribly impressive fish at first glance, and not really at second glance either. It’s about the length and width of a finger, silvery and kind of see-through – looks a bit like a sardine. They’re not particularly clever or cute, but Mandi Finger, a University of California Davis population geneticist, says the delta smelt do have one Read More…

Lawsuit Launched to Protect Imperiled California Fish

Center for Biological Diversity — The Center for Biological Diversity filed a notice of intent today to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the Clear Lake hitch, a large minnow found only in Northern California’s Clear Lake and its tributaries. The Trump administration denied the fish protection in a December 2020 determination. Under Read More…

Water flows down Elk Falls Canyon to increase to accommodate…

Campbell River Mirror — BC Hydro will increase water flows within Elk Falls Canyon to assist steelhead migrating and spawning below Elk Falls beginning March 2. BC Hydro is commencing five, two-day in duration, steelhead migration and spawning flows down Elk Falls Canyon, Stephen Watson, BC Hydro stakeholde rengagement advisor, said. This is to enable fish to access good habitat from the Read More…

Coho numbers climb thanks to partnership

The Wenatchee World — On a golden autumn day, the reflection of bright yellow leaves in the river was broken by the movement of dark red fish. Leaning over the rail of a bridge, I could see salmon jockeying for position over the cobbles of the riverbed. Throughout October and well into November, visitors to Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery could expect to see coho salmon in Icicle Creek. Read More…

Indigenous input key to Columbia River Treaty negotiations

  Kimberley Bulletin — Indigenous input has been a key element in developing Canada’s priorities for renegotiating the terms of the Columbia River Treaty with the United States. The Ktunaxa Nation, Syilx/Okanagan Nation and Secwepemc Nation joined the treaty talks as observers two years ago. Beyond the negotiating table between Canada and the United States, Indigenous input has Read More…

EPA raises vessel sunken in January to protect Lake Tahoe

EPA — Today, weather permitting, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will raise a vessel first reported sunk in Lake Tahoe on January 15. EPA, in coordination with the El Dorado County Sheriff, the Lahontan  Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response is taking Read More…

California’s climate goals likely out of reach

CalMatters — California is unlikely to meet its ambitious climate goals, two reports released Tuesday show. The first, from California State Auditor Elaine Howle, doesn’t mince words: “The state will fall short of meeting the 2030 goal” of a 40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels “unless emissions reductions occur at a faster pace.” The audit, which found Read More…

High Sierra Electronics Announces Innovative New Remote Erosion…

PR Newswire — Today, High Sierra Electronics (hsierra.com), a Grass Valley, California-based, manufacturer of environmental monitoring products, announced a new system that can detect when and where levee erosion has occurred and automatically alert and inform levee owners, managers, and public safety officials. The system, known as REMS, short for Remote Erosion Monitoring System, Read More…

‘It’s an iconic fish’ — Steelhead data used by multiple…

Idaho Press — University of Idaho researchers are helping anglers and state fishery managers learn more about steelhead to better manage a renowned fishery that has had its ups and downs. Steelhead are rainbow trout native to the Pacific Northwest that hatch in small tributaries of many Idaho rivers. They annually migrate more than 600 miles from Idaho’s freshwater interior to the Read More…

Logging change in Puget Sound: Researchers use UW vessel logbooks to…

University of Washington — To understand how Puget Sound has changed, we first must understand how it used to be. Unlike most major estuaries in the U.S. — and despite the abundance of world-class oceanographic institutions in the area — long-term monitoring of Puget Sound fish populations did not exist until 1990. Filling in this missing information is essential to establishing a Read More…