Flows and Ecosystem Function Dominate Delta Plan Amendment

SF Estuary Magazine – With the Delta lagging behind the Bay on four of the State of the Estuary Report’s five indicators, the last long-range plan for restoring its ecological health abandoned, and the threats from climate change becoming ever more alarming, the need for a new regulatory vision for the region may never have been greater. A pending amendment to the Delta Plan, shared by Ron Read More…

Endangered fish found only in Utah Lake to be reclassified as…

Daily Herald – The June sucker, a fish native only to Utah Valley, will likely be removed from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s endangered species list and be reclassified as threatened, a significant step for a species whose total population dipped to as low as 300 two decades ago. The grey, marble-eyed fish is only found in Utah Lake and its water sources, which include Read More…

California Urged to Rethink 40 Years of ‘Piecemeal’ Freshwater…

Courthouse News Service – When wet weather mercifully returned to California in 2017, it not only stabilized a booming farming economy and pulled millions of residents from drought – it also staved off an extinction event brewing in the state’s majestic snow-fed rivers. Ultimately the drought had relatively minor impacts on most urban Californians who suddenly had to do things like Read More…

Conservation groups challenge U.S. Army, USFWS over harm to San Pedro…

AZ Public Media – Three conservation groups have filed a notice to sue the U.S. Army and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for what they allege is a failure to protect the San Pedro River. The Center for Biological Diversity, Maricopa Audubon Society and the Grand Canyon Chapter of the Sierra Club's filed the notice on Tuesday. The lawsuit challenges the approval Fish and Wildlife Service Read More…

Let there be light: creeks gain visibility through restoration

Bay Area Monitor – Stroll through just about any of the cities ringing the San Francisco Bay and you’re likely walking on water. Not literally, of course. Rather, chances are that somewhere along your way, there’s a stream running beneath your feet. As land around the Bay was developed, creeks were rerouted underground through pipes called culverts for flood protection. But in some Read More…

Die-off prompts ODFW to close Wilson River to salmon angling

Tillamook County Pioneer – A recent die-off of fall Chinook salmon in the Wilson River has prompted fishery managers to close the river to all salmon angling, effective Dec. 7 – 31. The closure is from the confluence with Blind Slough (in tidewater at river mile 0.5) upstream to Jordan Creek. The river upstream of Jordan Creek is already closed to salmon angling by permanent rule. Angling Read More…

Utah Lake’s endangered June suckers are bouncing back

The Salt Lake Tribune – After three decades of costly recovery efforts, Utah Lake’s June suckers have rebounded from near extinction to a point at which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed downgrading the fish’s protection status from endangered to threatened. An emergency captive-rearing program saved the large-bodied fish, but much work needs to be done to put the Read More…

Sporting Club plans 850-foot Snake riverbank stabilization

Jackson Hole News & Guide – The Snake River Sporting Club is proposing to use a man-made logjam to steer the Snake River away from a fast-eroding channel and then line about 850 feet of the downstream riverbank with exposed root wads secured by buried tree trunks. The riverbank stabilization plans are outlined in a permit application that the club submitted Nov. 22 to the U.S. Read More…

Using Science to Help Salmon in the Tuolumne River

Ag Info – Michael Franz owns Franz wholesale ornamental nursery with his brother in the Stanislaus County town of Hickman. He also serves as board member of the Turlock Irrigation District, which delivers water to thousands of acres of almonds and walnuts. He comments on State’s Water Resources control board effort to take water from farmers and give it to salmon. “We are confident Read More…

‘Fish vampires’ attaching to trout in the Great Lakes

FOX 17 – A 12-year project at Michigan State University has set out to learn just how invasive species affect the Great Lakes, and its trout population. It took multiple Graduate students years to see how Sea Lamprey- also known as Vampire Fish- affect the ecosystem. The lamprey, which are an invasive species, use sharp teeth to latch onto fish and suck their blood. At MSU, they've Read More…