State fisheries scientist tackles marine ecology of salmon off…

KFSK — The state of Alaska now has a scientist at work trying to tackle the big question – what’s happening to Alaska salmon once they’re in the ocean environment? That task falls to Katie Howard, an Anchorage-based fisheries scientist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Commercial Fisheries. She’s been working for Fish and Game since 2009 but started in Read More…

Smelt Get a Review, But No Change In Status

JD Supra — On November 16, 2020, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (“USFWS”) published its annual review of species that are candidates for listing as either threatened or endangered species, its findings on resubmitted petitions for listing actions, and its annual description of progress on pending listing actions.  Among those pending listing actions are two petitions that are highly Read More…

Zero Delta Smelt Found in Latest Search. New Habitat Hopes To Change…

GV Wire — An annual search for a tiny endangered and contentious fish in the sprawling California Delta has once again come up empty. The state’s annual Fall Midwater Trawl Survey found no delta smelt in September’s sampling of the critical waterway. The last time the rare fish turned up in a survey was in October 2017 when just two were found. Hoping to reverse the recent trend, Read More…

Delta smelt in big trouble – base of the food chain is MIA

Red Green and Blue — We will find out at the end of December after the October, November and December totals of Delta smelt, longfin smelt, striped bass, threadfin shad, American shad and Sacramento splittail caught in the annual survey are tallied by the CDFW. Once the most abundant native fish in the entire Delta, no Delta Smelt were  reported in the Fall MIdwater Trawl in either 2018 Read More…

Middle Fork salmon redd count looks promising

The Challis Messenger — Each year in late summer and early fall, Chinook travel more than 800 miles from the ocean to scoop out gravel nests in the small streams of the central Idaho wilderness and deposit their eggs. Idaho Fish and Game biologists are literally hovering over the streams and taking notes. Fish and Game recently completed a 460-mile aerial helicopter survey of Chinook Read More…

Historic Deal Revives Plan for Largest US Dam Demolition

Voice of America — An agreement announced Tuesday paves the way for the largest dam demolition in U.S. history, a project that promises to reopen hundreds of miles of waterway along the Oregon-California border to salmon that are critical to tribes but have dwindled to almost nothing in recent years. If approved, the deal would revive plans to remove four massive hydroelectric dams on the Read More…

Call to break U.S. dam so salmon can return to Similkameen River in…

The Province — A B.C. outdoors group is calling for the removal of an unused dam in Washington to allow salmon to return to the Similkameen River. Mark Angelo, river chair for the Outdoor Recreation Council of B.C., said the Enloe Dam — north of Oroville, Washington — had not produced hydro power since 1954 and did not provide irrigation or flood control. He said the concrete dam was Read More…

Is 2020 the year Putah-borne salmon return to the creek?

Daily Republic — The boards were pulled at the Los Rios Check Dam and the earthen dam at the Road 106A crossing was broken down this week, allowing salmon to return to Putah Creek. Officials are eager to see this year’s spawn because it is possible that those born during the 1,700-fish run in 2017 could be returning. The early signs are good, but Rich Marovich cautioned the official Read More…

Local Action Leads to Salmon Comeback in Washington’s Hood Canal

Columbia University— Facing the deterioration of the rivers where they breed, salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest have been declining for decades. But in Washington State’s Hood Canal, one species of salmon, summer chum (Oncorhynchus keta), is recovering to levels that could result in its removal from the endangered species list. Summer chum salmon populations in Hood Canal, a Read More…

Turbines at Detroit Dam temporarily turned off to help migrating fish

Statesman Journal — There won't be as much electricity produced at Detroit Dam this winter. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will periodically turn off turbines at the dam to help juvenile salmon make their way downstream in the North Santiam River. The turbines will be off between 6 and 10 a.m. and 6 and 10 p.m. each day through Feb. 21. The Corps is making the adjustments after Read More…