Pacific Northwest Tribes Demand Removal of Columbia River Dams to…

TIME – Two prominent Pacific Northwest tribes said Monday the U.S. government needs to remove three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River to save migrating salmon and starving orcas and restore traditional fishing sites that were guaranteed to the tribes in a treaty more than 150 years ago. The Yakama Nation and the Lummi Nation made the demand on Indigenous People’s Day, a Read More…

Mt. Eccles salmon-hatching sheds light on climate change

The Cordoba Times – When a mischievous Mt. Eccles student cranked up the temperature on the school’s 30-gallon salmon tank, it threatened to undo months of work. But the prank also helped teach students a lesson, said Kate Morse, program director for the Copper River Watershed Project. “It wasn’t an ideal situation, but it gave us a very teachable moment regarding climate change, Read More…

Pacific tribes across borders declare ‘salmon emergency’

KRBD – Tribal representatives from across Southeast Alaska, British Columbia and Washington state are sounding the alarm over threats posed to wild salmon across state and national borders. “We will not surrender our responsibilities as stewards of the land and resources entrusted to us by our creator,” John Ward of the Taku River Tlingit in Atlin, British Columbia said in a Read More…

Two giant sturgeon get a new home in Idaho Falls

East Idaho News – Two 7-foot long sturgeon were transported 190 miles from the Hagerman Fish Hatchery to the Snake River in Idaho Falls after spending the first 25 years of their life in a Fish and Game display pond, but these long-lived giants still have a long life ahead of them. “Sturgeon can live to be around 100 years of age,” says Fisheries Biologist Pat Kennedy with Fish and Read More…

Hybrid salmon discovered by scientists on Vancouver Island

CBC – Two salmon researchers say a surprising discovery has been made on Vancouver Island. Andres Araujo, a biologist at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and Will Duguid, a PhD biology student at the University of Victoria, recently found fish in the Cowichan River, north of Victoria, B.C., that have the genes of both coho and chinook salmon. Tissue samples revealed the Read More…

Park Service plan for Colorado River below Glen Canyon to include…

St. George News – The National Park Service approved a plan this week to protect native fish and other aquatic species in the Colorado River below the Glen Canyon Dam within Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park. According to a press release from the National Park Service, the Expanded Non-native Aquatic Species management plan sets in place a phased approach Read More…

Conflicting chinook seasons on Snake put Washington, Idaho goals at…

The Spokesman-Review – Later this month, Idaho and Washington are set to have conflicting fall chinook fishing regulations on the Snake River, a rare occurrence that is contrary to goals of the two states. The differing regulations arose out of recent changes designed to protect hatchery steelhead returning to the Clearwater River. So few hatchery B-run steelhead are returning this year Read More…

Fishing line receptacles will help keep local riverbanks clean

Taft Midway Driller – Besides being unsightly, Grochol was mostly concerned about the potential safety hazards the abandoned line and hooks posed to people, dogs, and wildlife. Dunsmuir Rotary President Wendi Grochol saw her longtime dream come true last week when the first of six fishing line receptacles was installed at Tauhindauli Park. Last Wednesday, after the Dunsmuir Rotary Club’s Read More…

Outdated culvert thwarts spawning fish

The Columbia Valley Pioneer – Ben Mitchell-Banks slowly walks up Abel Creek. Rustling leaves, crackling branches, and the ever-present running water creates a peaceful soundtrack alongside the dirt road in the District of Invermere. Mr. Mitchell-Banks holds a net, eyes peeled downward for the tell-tale streak of red in the water that gives away a Kokanee salmon’s presence. He carefully Read More…

How the Salton Sea Became an Eco Wasteland

Howstuffworks – California's largest inland lake, the Salton Sea, lies in the Imperial and Coachella valleys. The lake, which is more than 50 percent saltier than the Pacific Ocean, is becoming more salt than water because it's essentially evaporating. The lake and the area that surrounds it — once hotspots for tourism and wildlife — have essentially become ghost towns. But while Read More…