‘Tsunami’ fish shows up in Monterey Bay

Monterey Herald – An exotic “tsunami fish” has been hanging out near the Monterey breakwater wall off San Carlos Beach, for the past month. Since Oct. 15, Nicholas Ta,27, and Dennis Marshall Lewis, 23, divemasters of Bamboo Reef Dive Center, have spotted a non-native, lonely barred knifejaw several times while diving in the area. This is the fifth sighting of the fish in Monterey Read More…

Salmon Conservation & Water Science

World Water Monitoring Day – The Students for Salmon Program (SFS) engages 4th grade students in streamside science so they can better understand the health of their watershed and build stewardship ethics. Salmon, an icon of the Pacific Northwest culture, economy, and ecosystem, are used as a lens to inspire wonder in the natural world and catalyze an environmental ethic. SFS consists of two Read More…

Exchange: How to Rebuild a River

Wild Salmon Center – Nine of our Russian partners traveled across Montana and Idaho this fall to learn first hand how U.S. companies and government agencies rehabilitate fish-bearing creeks damaged by placer mining. The trip was part of Wild Salmon Center’s exchange program, which brings together Russian and American scientists and conservationists. The US Forest Service has been a long Read More…

Bill to Protect Salmon, Steelhead From Sea Lions Clears U.S. Senate

Columbia Basin Herald – A bill designed to curb sea lions preying on at-risk fish populations on the Columbia River and select tributaries passed through the U.S. Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 3119 amends the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, which prohibits the killing of marine mammals, and puts into place a permit process that allows those with permits to legally kill sea lions Read More…

Learning about Atlantic Salmon in Greenland via Satellite Tags

NOAA Fisheries – For ten days in October, NOAA Fisheries biologist Tim Sheehan spent 6-8 hours each day with a local fisherman trolling slowly in Igaliko Fjord in southwest Greenland, hoping to capture pre-adult Atlantic salmon. Their plan: capture and release all fish alive with a pop-up satellite tag attached to as many as possible, and hope the tags stay on between 5 and 10 months, Read More…

Stretch of Skagit riverfront permanently protected for fish, wildlife

The Seattle Times – A 1,500-footlong stretch of riverfront along the Skagit River near Rockport, Skagit County, totaling 61 acres has been permanently protected by Seattle City Light for fish and wildlife habitat. The land connects to other protected parcels to create a wildlife corridor for elk and other wildlife. Bald eagles fishing for salmon, and all five species of Pacific Read More…

Central Washington fosters steelhead resurgence

NOAA Fisheries – Farmer Urban Eberhart recalls watching a video of Middle Columbia River steelhead trying in vain a few years ago to jump a diversion dam blocking historic spawning grounds in the upper reaches of Central Washington’s Manastash Creek. Now that diversion dam is gone, dismantled through the cooperative efforts of local irrigators, Kittitas County Conservation District, and Read More…

Heavy rains could threaten salmon spawn from toxic Camp Fire runoff

The Orion – With the Camp Fire 100% contained, evacuation orders are slowly being lifted and roads are opening up allowing residents of Honey Run and Butte Creek Canyon to return to their property for the first time since being ravaged by the Camp Fire. However, with cleanup efforts still in their early stages the danger is far from over. The Butte County Public Health Department has Read More…

Officials fear dam release harmed lake’s fish species

Arizona Daily Sun – Wildlife officials are working to figure out the impact of a release of more than 9 billion gallons (34.1 billion liters) of water from a dam in western Arizona. The Arizona Department of Game and Fish conducted a study of the March water release from Alamo Dam months ago, and the results will be available early next year. Officials fear the worst for the Read More…

Let it flow: In about-face, state breaks and shifts levees to restore…

Cal Matters – At the confluence of the San Joaquin and Tuolumne rivers, a winter of heavy rains could inundate about 1,200 acres of riverside woodland for the first time in 60 years. That’s by design: Here, a few miles west of Modesto, work crews removed or broke several miles of levee last spring and replanted the land with tens of thousands of native sapling trees and shrubs. “We Read More…