Feds send $26 million relief for California crab fishery disaster

The Press Democrat – Nearly $26 million of relief from the federal government is on its way to fishermen and women affected by the ill-fated commercial Dungeness crab season in the North Coast three years ago. “I’m confident that checks will be in the mail for fisherman and fishing businesses hopefully by the new year,” said Noah Oppenheim, executive director of the 700-member Pacific Read More…

New NOAA Fisheries plan adopts ecosystem management principles

NOAA Fisheries – The draft Western Roadmap Implementation Plan (WRIP), tiered off NOAA Fisheries’ national Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management Policy and Roadmap, offers a distinctly different way of thinking about fisheries in the California Current Ecosystem. Instead of considering and managing species in isolation, fisheries managers will weigh the role of species in an ecosystem when Read More…

‘River Jedi’

US Fish and Wildlife Service – On a cold, dark, moonless night last December, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife boat stealthily cruised along the upper Sacramento River near Corning, California on its nightly mission to find green sturgeon. Except for the sound of the boat engine signaling a change of location, and an occasional coyote howl heard off in the distance, most of the four-hour trip Read More…

Nuns Resurrect Endangered Salamanders in First-of-its-Kind…

National Geographic – Lake Pátzcuaro, the third largest lake in Mexico, lies a little more than 200 miles west of Mexico City. As an endorheic basin, the lake does not drain into the sea—and it’s the sole home for a rare, unique species of salamander. Locally known as “achoques,” the Lake Pátzcuaro salamander (Ambystoma dumerilii) is an amphibian that lives its entire Read More…

There’s an Unexpected Weather Connection Between New Zealand And…

Science Alert – Scientists have come up with a new way to figure out how much winter rainfall is going to occur in California - simply check out what was happening near New Zealand over the previous seasons. They're calling it the New Zealand Index, and it's more accurate than the previous method of predicting rainfall, which was based on El Niño and has become unreliable due to climate Read More…

EPA fines NorCal gravel miner for dumping on endangered salmon

SF Gate – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency hasn't exactly been known for its teeth as of late, but don't tell that to a Humboldt County gravel miner who just got bit by the feds for dumping pollution on endangered salmon. In court documents filed Monday, Jack Noble agreed to pay a $10,000 fine and undertake extensive remediation efforts to undo an elaborate dumping operation into Read More…

Unprecedented Weather in 2017 Hurts Clarity Level in Lake Tahoe

UC Davis – storic drought followed by record-breaking precipitation and warm lake temperatures converged to produce the lowest annual average clarity levels recorded at Lake Tahoe in 2017, indicates data released by the Tahoe Environmental Research Center at the University of California, Davis. The average annual clarity level for 2017 was 59.7 feet. This was a 9.5-foot decrease from Read More…

CDFW Accepting Proposals for Restoration Projects that Provide…

CDFW News – The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is now accepting proposals for wetland restoration projects to provide greenhouse gas benefits under its Wetlands Restoration for Greenhouse Gas Reduction Program. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2017-18, $12.75 million is available from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund for projects. The Proposal Solicitation Notice released today Read More…

Ancient River Could Flow Again in Tucson, Thanks to Recycled…

News Deeply – The Santa Cruz River was once the lifeblood of Tucson, Arizona. Due to heavy development and groundwater overdraft, it hasn’t seen year-round flow in 70 years. The city plans to revive the storied desert river with recycled effluent. Recycled wastewater is gaining wider acceptance to boost drinking water supplies across the arid West. Now a project in Tucson could mark Read More…

Hood Canal changes color again, thanks to plankton bloom

Kitsap Sun – Hood Canal has changed colors again, shifting to shades of bimini green, as it did in 2016, when satellite photos showed the canal standing out starkly among all other waters in the Northwest. The color change is caused by a bloom of a specific type of plankton called a coccolithophore, which shows up in nutrient-poor waters. The single-celled organism produces shells made Read More…