Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?

EurekAlert! — River water, lake water, and seawater contain DNA belonging to organisms such as animals and plants. Ecologists have begun to actively analyze such DNA molecules, called environmental DNA, to assess the distribution of macro-organisms. Challenges yet remain, however, in quantitative applications of environmental DNA. In a research article published online in Molecular Read More…

Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish…

Science Daily — Because fish that are ready to mate and their young are especially sensitive to changes in temperature, in the future up to 60 percent of all species may be forced to leave their traditional spawning areas. In a new meta-study, experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have published ground-breaking findings on the Read More…

Research reveals fishing pressures affect tropical and temperate…

Science Daily — In a study published recently in Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers focused on what can happen to ocean ecosystems when fishing pressure increases or decreases, and how this differs between tropical to temperate marine ecosystems. The team, led by Elizabeth Madin, researcher at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) in the University of Hawai'i Read More…

Waterborne toxic pollutants can affect fish for generations

Sustainability Times —  The effects of some forms of chemical poisoning acquired from the environment can pass down three generations. At least in fish. Small fish that get exposed even to low levels of synthetic endocrine-disrupting chemicals that have become common in many freshwater sources can end up passing on the genetic impacts of these chemicals to their offspring that were Read More…

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?

EureakAlert! — They contain no carbohydrates. No fats. No proteins. Not much else but water. Still, the moon jelly (Aurelia aurita) are eaten by predators in the sea; fish, crustaceans, sea anemones and even corals and turtles. Now a new study may explain why these predators bother to eat the gelatinous creatures. The study is based on moon jelly samples from a German Fjord. - The Read More…

Experiment shows it is possible for fish to migrate via ingestion by…

PhysOrg — A team of researchers from the Danube Research Institute and the National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, both in Hungary, and Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Spain reports that is it possible for fish eggs to survive the trip through the bird digestive tract and subsequently to hatch. In their paper published in Read More…

How does light affect what bass eat?

The Rogersville Review — Conventional angling wisdom says in clear water use “natural looking” lures. On bright days, use light colors. In low light or more turbid water, use darker colored lures. But do bass pick and choose what they eat based on the same criteria? Does their diet change based on water clarity? In a recent column for Bassmaster.com, B.A.S.S. National Read More…

Hunting with orcas: Southern Resident killer whales tell one salmon…

Chinook Observer — Southern Resident killer whales can tell a lot about salmon using only sound. This is especially interesting to Marla Holt, who studies how integral sound is to the lives of Southern Resident killer whales. Indeed, it’s critical to their hunting abilities. It is so precise that the whales can tell one species of fish from another. Their hunting is also easily Read More…

UAPB project studies effects of invasive Asian bigheaded carps

Sentinel-Record — "Natural resource agencies nationwide have become concerned about aquatic nuisance species to the point of adopting state-level management plans to complement existing national management plans," Michael Eggleton, UAPB professor of aquaculture and fisheries, said in the release. "The Arkansas Aquatic Nuisance Species Management Plan has specific criteria to identify focal Read More…

Research into ecosystem tipping points in Arctic

Mirage News — New Horizon 2020 project, ECOTIP, will assess the cascading effects of climate change to Arctic marine ecosystems and depending societies The ambitious new ECOTIP initiative will bring together a multidisciplinary group of scientists from more than 10 countries to study ecosystem tipping cascades in the Arctic marine environment. This major international effort will Read More…