Freshwater giants are dying

Up News Info – Some of the most amazing creatures on Earth hide in rivers and lakes: giant catfish weighing more than 600 pounds, stripes the length of the Volkswagen Beetles, trout six feet long that can swallow an entire mouse. There are about 200 species of the so-called freshwater megafauna, but compared to their terrestrial and marine counterparts, scientists study them little and Read More…

Researchers tap salmon DNA to decode marine mysteries

Canada's National Observer – Looking back, Christoph Deeg admits he didn’t know what he was getting into when he accepted a job on a high-seas expedition in the dead of winter on the RV Professor Kaganovskiy. At the time, the 33-year-old biologist and genomics specialist was fresh off completing his PhD, and he jumped at the chance to join 20 other scientists from five Pacific Rim Read More…

Fisheries Management Is Actually Working, Global Analysis Shows

Science Blog – Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance. Effective management appears to be the main reason these stocks are at sustainable levels or successfully rebuilding. That is the main finding of an international project led by the University of Washington to compile and analyze data from Read More…

Fisheries management is actually working, global analysis shows

UW News – Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance. Effective management appears to be the main reason these stocks are at sustainable levels or successfully rebuilding. That is the main finding of an international project led by the University of Washington to compile and analyze data from Read More…

Study: Reassessing impacts of ocean acidification on fish behaviour

Tunise Soir – Ocean acidification due to rising CO2 levels may have a negligible impact on critical behaviours of coral reef fishes, reports a paper published in Nature. The findings, which challenge previous research, are the results of a multi-year, multi-species project aimed at assessing the impact of ocean acidification on coral reef fishes. By the end of the century, the Read More…

Take It or Leave It

The Current – The oil platforms off the Santa Barbara coast are a familiar sight to local residents. The structures tower above the ocean surface like industrial factories. But below the water, the rigs are like high-rise apartment buildings, providing homes to a vibrant community of sea life. Of California’s 23 federal offshore platforms, many are nearing the end of their lives, and Read More…

New assessment method reveals many fish stocks are in urgent need of…

Sea Around Us – A newly developed method for assessing how abundant fish populations are and how fishing is affecting them revealed that several fish stocks across oceans are far below internationally agreed minimum levels and in urgent need of sustainable management. The methodology, known as Abundance Maximum Sustainable Yields or AMSY, was developed by an international team of Read More…

DNA barcodes help identify fish eggs and inform conservation

Massive Science – Fish are economically and ecologically important in the Gulf of Mexico, yet their stocks are decreasing due to overfishing. One major way that we can help protect fish is to protect the habitats where they reproduce. But in order to do that, we first have to find out where they reproduce. One way to find these spawning habitats is by using floating fish eggs. Before Read More…

Collaborative Conservation Approach for Endangered Reef Fish Yields…

UC San Diego – A new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations. The study, published January 6, 2020 in Proceedings of the Read More…

eDNA Expands Species Surveys to Capture a More Complete Picture

  NOAA Fisheries – Tiny bits of DNA collected from waters off the West Coast allowed scientists to identify more species of marine vertebrates than traditional surveys with trawl nets. They also reflect environmental shifts such as unusual ocean temperatures that affect the organisms present, new research shows. The findings published  in Frontiers in Marine Science demonstrate Read More…