Research funded by federal power marketing agency suggests dams…

The Spokesman-Review — A controversial new study is challenging long-standing science that pins salmon declines in the Snake River Basin on dams and is roiling the already rough waters of fish recovery. The work by British Columbia scientist David Welch puts the blame for poor returns of adult Snake River spring and fall chinook salmon on conditions in the Pacific Ocean instead of the Read More…

Study supports theory that fish fins evolved from gill arches

New Atlas — The skeletal structure of a fish's gill arches and paired fins are quite similar – enough so that it was once believed the fins evolved from the arches. Although that theory has since been discounted, a new study suggests it may have been right on the money. First of all, "paired" simply refers to fins that there are a matching set of, like the pectoral fins located at the Read More…

Otters Show How Predators Can Blunt Climate Damage

Scientific American — While scuba diving around the Aleutian Islands in 2014, marine ecologist Doug Rasher saw little sign of the curtains of lush green kelp forests he would have had to push through decades earlier. “It feels like a ghost town,” says Rasher, a researcher at the nonprofit Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. The eeriness did not end there: during a boat ride, one of Read More…

Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their…

EurekAlert! — Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales. Dr. Dan Pendleton and Dr. Jessica Redfern partnered with Dr. Elizabeth Holmes of the National Marine Fisheries Service and Dr. Jinlun Zhang of the University of Washington for the Read More…

Study Finds Some Sport Fish Are Caught Repeatedly – Which Could…

NC State News — A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries. The study makes use of data from tagging programs, in which researchers tag Read More…

Fish carcasses deliver toxic mercury pollution to the deepest ocean…

ScienceDaily — The sinking carcasses of fish from near-surface waters deliver toxic mercury pollution to the most remote and inaccessible parts of the world's oceans, including the deepest spot of them all: the 36,000-foot-deep Mariana Trench in the northwest Pacific. And most of that mercury began its long journey to the deep-sea trenches as atmospheric emissions from coal-fired power Read More…

Acoustics of the deep sea tell us about biodiversity

The Virginian Pilot — You might know what a hydrothermal vent looks like: black plumes billowing from deep-sea pillars encrusted with tube worms, hairy crabs, pouting fish. But do you know what it sounds like? To the untrained ear, a hydrothermal vent — or more precisely, one vent from the Suiyo Seamount southeast of Japan — generates a viscous, muffled burbling that recalls Read More…

Adults salmons’ anchovy diet may be causing juvenile mortality

Daily Republic — On a day the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reported a salmon population increase in Clear Creek off the Sacramento River near Redding, and touted an improved trout spawning route for endangered Lahontan cutthroat trout, it also reported juvenile Chinook salmon were dying in the Central Valley hatcheries. Although the exact cause, and the greater effect in the rivers, Read More…

Wolves alter wetland creation and recolonization by killing ecosystem…

Mirage News — Beavers are some of the world’s most prolific ecosystem engineers, creating, maintaining and radically altering wetlands almost everywhere they live. But what, if anything, might control this engineering by beavers and influence the formation of North America’s wetlands? In a new paper published in the journal Science Advances, researchers with the University of Read More…

Lithium Cures Tapeworm-Driven Brainwashing in Fish

Inside Science — Brain-controlling parasites can be thwarted in fish by using the same medication used to treat bipolar disorder in humans, according to new research. "It’s only the second time people have rescued the behavior of manipulated hosts," said Nadia Aubin-Horth, a biology professor at Laval University in Canada, who conducted the study with her colleagues. The findings were Read More…