Anglers and researchers delve into fish guts to save salmon

Canada's National Observer — Micah Quindazzi has spent a good chunk of his science career elbows deep in pungent fish guts. Squeezing out stomachs and poking through intestines seems like distasteful and ignoble work, but it’s part of a wider collaborative effort by researchers and recreational fishermen to save endangered salmon and divine changes to the marine food web as climate Read More…

Cultural Biases Impact Native Fish, Too

UC Davis — From art to religion to land use, much of what is deemed valuable in the United States was shaped centuries ago by the white male perspective. Fish, it turns out, are no exception. A study published in Fisheries Magazine, a journal of the American Fisheries Society, explores how colonialist attitudes toward native fishes were rooted in elements of racism and sexism. It Read More…

New Study Finds the Future of Recreational Fishing is at Risk Due to…

Carleton Newsroom — Globally, freshwater recreational fishing is at risk due to climate change and a new study finds that not enough is being done to save it. Fishing plays an important sociocultural, ecological and economic role in ecosystems and communities around the world, and the industry is rapidly growing and changing. Like all species, recreational fish are under threat from Read More…

Depending on friends makes life easier for reef fish

Earth.com — A growing collection of research shows that animals with much less complex minds than humans are surprisingly connected on a social level. A new study reveals that reef fish and other types of social fish depend on friendships for their very survival.  Study lead author Dr. Lauren Nadler is an assistant professor in the (NSU) Halmos College of Arts and Sciences at the Nova Read More…

New Salmon Study Sheds Considerable light on Marine Migratory…

Afloat — Marine survival of salmon in the eastern North Atlantic has substantially declined in recent decades, yet little was known about the migratory behaviour and distribution of populations. A new genetic tagging study, just published in the international journal Fish & Fisheries, shows where young salmon gather and begin to migrate during their first summer at sea; migrating along the Read More…

Scientists ‘surprised’ to find no evidence of impact on fish…

ABC Net — Marine scientists given access to a petroleum industry survey vessel to test the impact of seismic air guns were surprised to find fish behaviour and health were unaffected. Concerns have long been held about the impact of repeated loud noises from the air guns on marine life. Senior principal research scientist with the Australian Institute of Marine Science, Mark Meekan, said Read More…

Juvenile Chinook salmon use of sandbar willows in a large-scale,…

Springer.com — Outmigrating, juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, with access to floodplains (e.g., Yolo Bypass California, USA), grow faster than those restricted to the main channel of the Sacramento River. How these young salmon might use rooted, vegetative structure (e.g., to decrease energy expenditures) while holding positions in flowing water on floodplains and flooded Read More…

Tiny organisms shed big light on ocean nutrients

EurekAlert! — As the world warms, sweeping changes in marine nutrients seem like an expected consequence of increased ocean temperatures. However, the reality is more complicated. New research suggests that processes below the ocean surface may be controlling what is happening above. Plankton are some of the most numerous and important organisms in the ocean. The balance of chemical elements Read More…

Climate change threatens food security of many countries dependent on…

PhysOrg — Millions of people in countries around the world could face an increased risk of malnutrition as climate change threatens their local fisheries. New projections examining more than 800 fish species in more than 157 countries have revealed how two major, and growing, pressures—climate changeand over-fishing—could impact the availability of vital micronutrients from our Read More…

Decreased Growth Rate Associated with Tissue Contaminants in Juvenile…

ACS Publications — The industrial waterway in Portland Harbor, Oregon, is a migration corridor for a distinct population segment of Chinook Salmon (Upper Willamette River) currently protected by the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Juveniles are exposed to a suite of contaminants during outmigration including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and Read More…