A Stanford-led study finds warming waters drove collapse of…

Stanford News – The culprit responsible for the decline of Mexico’s once lucrative jumbo squid fishery has remained a mystery, until now. A new Stanford-led study published in the ICES Journal of Marine Science identifies shifting weather patterns and ocean conditions as among the reasons for the collapse, which spells trouble for the Gulf of California’s marine ecosystems and Read More…

Robotic fish helps protect native species from invasive pests

University of Western Australia – Researchers at The University of Western Australia have developed a robotic fish that behaves like a bodyguard for native species and safeguards them against the aggressive attitudes of invasive pests. Lead researcher Dr Giovanni Polverino, from UWA’s Centre for Evolutionary Biology, was awarded one of the inaugural Forrest Postdoctoral Research Read More…

Invasive parasite threatens endangered species in San Marcos River

Community Impact – The San Marcos River is home to some of the most biologically diverse aquatic ecosystems in the southwestern United States, harboring multiple threatened and endangered species, according to the San Marcos River Foundation. And now researchers at Texas State University fear that an “increasingly severe” parasite problem in the San Marcos and Comal rivers could Read More…

‘Toxic Stew’ Stirred Up by Disasters Poses Long-Term Danger, New…

The New York Times – New research shows that the extreme weather and fires of recent years, similar to the flooding that has struck Louisiana and the Midwest, may be making Americans sick in ways researchers are only beginning to understand. By knocking chemicals loose from soil, homes, industrial-waste sites or other sources, and spreading them into the air, water and ground, disasters like Read More…

A fish tag that knows it’s been eaten is helping endangered…

CBC – New tracking devices inserted into Atlantic salmon reveal that up to 48 per cent of the critically endangered fish are being eaten while leaving Nova Scotia's Stewiacke River on their ocean migration. The insight is the result of acoustic tags that can tell when a tagged fish has been eaten. "It certainly is high, and it's somewhat higher than some work that was done by some Read More…

Killifish Eggs Can Survive Being Eaten

Sakai Magazine – Found in temporary desert pools and mangrove swamps, some species of killifish can go without water for weeks at a time. And their eggs are no different: no water, no problem! Now, scientists have found that the eggs of two killifish species are so hardy, they can withstand being digested by birds, too. The finding may be the first firm evidence supporting an idea that Read More…

Fewer Trees, More Water: Study Finds Runoff Boost From Forest Thinning

Sierra Nevada Research Institute – A century of fire suppression has left Western forests overgrown. That has interrupted nature’s regular fire cycle and means that when fires do happen, they become catastrophic because there is plentiful fuel to burn. It also means forests are sucking up more water than they did historically. How much more water? That’s always been difficult to Read More…

Duplicate Genes Let These Fish Switch Sex

Inside Science – For most animals, sex is fixed at birth. But for some fish, changing sex is business as usual. A new study published today in the journal Science Advances reveals how a Caribbean reef fish called the bluehead wrasse completely morphs its sex from female to male. Bluehead wrasses (Thalassoma bifasciatum) are social fish that live in groups with a large, blue-headed Read More…

California likely to see more extreme flooding and drought, UCSD…

FOX 5 – California is likely to see more extreme weather conditions in the future, according to scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Research Meteorologist Alexander Gershunov said flooding, drought, wildfires and mudslides could become more intense in the state because of atmospheric rivers. “An atmospheric river transports about two and a half times Read More…

Artificial Intelligence Powered Robotic Fish

VIA News – For the longest time, robots have been essential, even as developers tried to make them more human in the way they operate. Fast forward researchers at Cornell University have demystified this thought by going a notch higher and coming up with a robotic fish that tries to mimic how spiders initiate movements. A hydraulic robot that operates using the same principle of a spider Read More…