Contamination Of Aquatic Habitats With Antidepressants Disrupts Fish…

Science Trends – Use of pharmaceutical medications by humans is escalating globally. In fact, the number of pharmaceutical doses dispensed per year is predicted to reach 4.5 trillion by 2020, an increase of 24% from 2015 levels, with this trend being driven by a growing and aging human population, as well as greater access to healthcare across emerging markets (IMS, 2015). This rise in Read More…

Sea Snail Shells Dissolve in Increasingly Acidified Oceans

Lab Manager – Shelled marine creatures living in increasingly acidified oceans face a fight for survival as the impacts of climate change spread, a new study suggests. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, and the University of Plymouth, UK, assessed the impact of rising carbon dioxide levels on the large predatory "triton shell" gastropod (Charonia lampas). They found Read More…

Innovative Tool Allows Continental-Scale Water, Energy, and Land…

Lab Manager – A new large-scale hydroeconomic model, developed by the Water Program at IIASA, will allow researchers to study water systems across whole continents, looking at sustainability of supply and the impacts of water management on the energy and agricultural sectors. Hydroeconomic models are increasingly becoming an important tool for water resources planning in river basins. Read More…

The Earth’s tropical belt was shifting long before industrial times

Earth.com – An international research team led by the University of Arizona has managed to trace the movement of the northernmost edge of the tropics back 800 years. Up until now, tropical belt data was only available from around 1930, when instrumental record-keeping began. Shifts in the tropical boundary influence the position of deserts in the Northern Hemisphere just north of the Read More…

“Aquatic life is bathing in a soup of antidepressants,” says…

Big Think – In 2009, the NYC Department of Environment Protections discovered numerous pharmaceuticals floating around in the city's tap water. A 2010 follow-up study concluded that trace amounts of Ibuprofen, caffeine, Butalbital, DEET—yes, insect repellent—and a variety of prescription and illicit drugs, along with personal care products, posed no threat to us. A similar conclusion Read More…

How Warmer Columbia/Snake Water Temps Affect Adult Salmonid Migration…

The Columbia Basin Bulletin – A recent study that summarizes adult salmon and steelhead body temperatures as they migrate upstream in the Columbia River and into the Snake River found that spring and summer chinook salmon body temperatures largely match stream temperature, causing few delays as they migrate. However, as the river temperature warms, some fall chinook and most steelhead Read More…

Open Wide

Biographic – Imagine for a moment that you’re a copepod—a pinhead-sized, torpedo-shaped crustacean drifting along in the warm currents of the Indian Ocean. You’re a favored menu item for many other ocean dwellers, so you need to be on high alert. You spread your two long antennae wide, ready to detect the pressure wave of an approaching predator. At the first sign of danger, you can Read More…

Overfishing and Modern-Day Slavery

Tufts Now – You’re about to make a sandwich with canned albacore tuna today, and thinking that it’s all a good thing—nutritionists talk about the health benefits of eating more seafood, after all. One thing you probably didn’t think about is where exactly that tuna come from. For Jessica Sparks, that’s a crucial question. A 2014 graduate of the master’s in conservation Read More…

Clean Water Act benefits greatly outweigh the costs

Earth – Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have led the first comprehensive study to evaluate water pollution over the last several decades. The investigation revealed that the 1972 Clean Water Act has been successful in significantly improving water quality in the United States. The study was focused on 50 million water quality measurements collected between 1962 and Read More…

Early mammals hid from dinosaurs in the dark, changing their DNA…

National Geographic – The first mammals first lived some 160 million years ago, in a world ruled by reptiles. And now scientists suggest that hiding in the dark from these terrifying beasts may have left an imprint in mammals’ genes that can still be seen today. Most mammals were no bigger than a squirrel back then, and it would have been much safer to come out only at night, Read More…