Fishermen crucial for marine data collection

The Fish Site – The study, Guidelines for Industry-Science Data Collection, was undertaken to address the increasing need for a strategic approach to industry-science data collections in the face of reducing resources and growing need for evidence in fisheries management. Published in the journal Fish and Fisheries and written by a cross-sector group of science and fishing industry Read More…

Ways to minimize losses in flood-damaged nut orchards

Western Farm Press – Recent research on nut trees damaged by floods in 2017 may help growers protect their orchards from similar problems in future years. Flood damage to tree nut orchards was severe in California last year due to heavy rains throughout the Sacramento Valley and the northern San Joaquin Valley. In addition, the Oroville Dam damaged spillway crisis affected growers whose Read More…

Dams and Levees Lead to Slow Underwater Landslides

SDSU NewsCenter – For thousands of years, the mighty Mississippi River carried sediment downstream as it flowed into the Gulf of Mexico, building out the iconic Mississippi River Delta. As humans have built large dams and levees along the river over the past two centuries, sediment flow has been reduced, resulting in the slow recession of the delta since the 1950s. Now, a recent study led Read More…

How Deep-Sea Fish Are So Exceptionally Black

National Geographic – In the vast, featureless darkness of the oceans, fish take camouflage to a new art form. How do you blend in with nothing? Viperfish and creatures like it have evolved ever blacker—we're talking blacker than black—so they can hide in plain sight. "When you look at them, especially in the water, it’s just like a hole in the universe," says Sönke Read More…

Nature-Based Solutions Can Prevent $50 Billion in Gulf Coast Flood…

University of California, Santa Cruz – While coastal development and climate change are increasing the risk of flooding for communities along the U.S. Gulf Coast, restoration of marshes and oyster reefs are among the most cost-effective solutions for reducing those risks, according to a new study. Published April 11 in PLOS ONE, the study compares the cost effectiveness of nature-based and Read More…

Coho salmon die, chum salmon survive in stormwater runoff

Washington State University – WSU scientists have discovered that different species of salmon have varying reactions to polluted stormwater runoff. In a recent paper published in the journal Environmental Pollution, scientists found that coho salmon became sick and nearly died, within just a few hours of exposure to polluted stormwater. But chum salmon showed no signs of ill-effects Read More…

Are the media all ‘doom and gloom’? Not when it comes to coverage…

Science Daily – The news media are often accused by adopting a "doom and gloom" tone, especially when it comes to coverage of the environment. However, a new study on how journalists report on the state of our oceans shows that view may be misguided. The research, conducted by researchers at New York University and the University of Miami (Fla.), shows that "doom and gloom" language was Read More…

Sea lions wreaking havoc on the river

The Outlook – As the executive director of the Association of Northwest Steelheaders, Rees has a vested interested in these sea lions. Over the past several years, California and Steller sea lions that travel up the Willamette River in search of food have begun to threaten the populations of steelhead, salmon and sturgeon all along the river and its tributaries. "The Steller sea lion Read More…

How to catch a fish genome with big data

Phys Org – If you eat fish in the U.S., chances are it once swam in another country. That's because the U.S. imports over 80 percent of its seafood, according to estimates by the United Nations. New genetic research could help make farmed fish more palatable and bring America's wild fish species to dinner tables. Scientists have used big data and supercomputers to catch a fish genome, a Read More…

Disparities in coastal stream restoration in central California

EurekAlert – Stream restoration efforts along the coast of Central California are unevenly distributed, with activity more likely to occur in areas that are more highly populated and dominated by residents who are "whiter, wealthier, and more educated," according to an analysis by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In addition, coastal stream restoration is heavily Read More…