Linkages between flow regime, biota, and ecosystem processes:…

Science Mag – Human activities have altered the flow regimes of many of Earth's rivers, with negative impacts on biodiversity, water quality, and ecological processes. In a Review, Palmer and Ruhi explain how restoration designs now attempt to mimic ecologically important aspects of natural flow regimes, guided by insights into how variations in flow affect biota and ecosystem processes. To Read More…

Ecologists find strong evidence of fishing down the food web in…

Science Daily – Research by ecologists at the University of Toronto and Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry shows strong evidence in a freshwater lake of "fishing down the food web" -- the deliberate shift away from top predatory fish on the food chain to smaller species closer to the base. While the effect has historically been observed almost exclusively in marine Read More…

Fish DNA in lake sediment can help determine native species, study…

Folio – A new technique developed by University of Alberta biologists can determine whether certain fish populations are native to lakes in national parks. The technique takes a molecular approach, using environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis of lake sediment to provide important historical information necessary for determining the conservation status of many lakes in Western Read More…

Researchers explore fish movement to enhance underwater robots

Penn State News – To understand the sensing, control and physics of fish-swimming with the goal of mimicking their performance in advanced robotics, researchers in the Penn State Department of Mechanical Engineering, in collaboration with the University of Houston and the University of Virginia, have recently been awarded a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation Read More…

Fish larvae float across national borders, binding the world’s…

The Conversation – Fish populations are declining around the world, and many countries are trying to conserve them by regulating their fishing industries. However, controlling fishing locally may not do enough to strengthen fish populations. Often one nation’s fish stocks depend on the spawning grounds of a neighboring country, where fish release eggs and sperm into the water and larvae Read More…

Robotic fish predator strikes fear into invasive species

Futurity – Invasive species control is notoriously challenging, especially in lakes and rivers where native fish and other wildlife have limited options for escape. Soaring mosquitofish populations in freshwater lakes and rivers worldwide have decimated native fish and amphibian populations, and attempts to control the species through toxicants or trapping often fail or cause harm to Read More…

Fish farming started around 8,000 years ago in China: Study

Business Line – People in China were engaged in fish farming at least 8,000 years ago –at least 4,500 years earlier than the records exist from Egypt, showed an international study on Monday. A team of Japanese, Chinese, German and the UK, scouring an early stone age (Neolithic) settlement called Jiahu in the present-day Henan Province in Central China, stumbled upon evidence to show Read More…

Fish supper may carry risk of drug-resistant superbugs

The Telegraph – plate of fish and chips is increasingly likely to expose people to untreatable bacteria because of the spread of superbugs at sea, new research has found. A study of dolphins revealed a surge in antibiotic-resistant bugs that are dangerous to humans in the marine environment in just a handful of years. While the mammals themselves are eaten in very few parts of the Read More…

Researchers find the ocean’s missing plastic

Cosmos – Millions of tonnes of plastic is trapped along the world’s coastlines and will eventually find its way into the ocean, according to new research. And even if we stop dumping it today, the amount of plastic in the marine environment will continue to grow because our shorelines are working like a holding facility for plastic already on its way to sea. That’s the grim finding Read More…

Two New Electric Eel Species Discovered, Produce Record-Breaking…

Forbes – The first electric eel was discovered by Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus, well before the invention of the light bulb. In fact, the discovery of the electric eel is credited, in part with stimulating research on electricity. Now, researchers in Brazil have discovered not one, but two new species of electric eel, and they are even more impressive than the original. But first, some Read More…