Research ties lake trout to changes in Yellowstone ecosystem

Independent Record – The precipitous decline of Yellowstone Lake’s cutthroat trout population during the past 30 years following the illegal introduction of nonnative lake trout has had impacts on everything from zooplankton and water temperature to grizzly bears and otters, according to a newly published paper. "Our study illustrates the potential impact of a single, invasive Read More…

Climate change and drought threaten small mountain streams in the…

UC Santa Cruz – Small mountain streams and the vibrant ecosystems they support were hit hard by the historic California drought of 2012 to 2015. Researchers monitoring aquatic life in Sierra Nevada streams observed significant declines in the numbers of aquatic insects and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates during the drought. The most vulnerable species included many of the larger insects Read More…

Wetland mud is ‘secret weapon’ against climate change

BBC News – Muddy, coastal marshes are "sleeping giants" that could fight climate change, scientists say. A global study has shown that these regions could be awoken by sea level rise. Sea level is directly linked to the amount of carbon these wetlands store in their soil, the team reports in the journal Nature. Researchers studied the carbon locked away in cores of wetland mud from Read More…

Insights from recreational fishers inform salmon escape study

Mirage News – Tasmanian recreational fishers have contributed to an Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) study of the potential ecological impacts of a salmon escape event in May 2018, when severe storms damaged salmon farming infrastructure off the east coast of Bruny Island. Led by Associate Professor Jeremy Lyle, the IMAS study released today drew on the experiences of Read More…

Tagged by scientists, bluefin tuna passing submerged listening lines…

EurekAlert! – An array of underwater listening lines that detect passing giant Atlantic bluefin tuna previously caught and tagged by scientists has created a new system to monitor these enormous, fast, powerful and lucrative fish in the open ocean. A 10-year research project using the technology sheds light on the species' natural mortality as well as migration, important information for Read More…

Changes in Ocean ‘Conveyor Belt’ Foretold Abrupt Climate Changes…

State of the Planet – In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant ‘conveyor belt’ carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. This circulation pattern is an important player in the global climate, regulating weather patterns in the Arctic, Europe, and around the world. Evidence increasingly suggests that this Read More…

Coastal ecosystems suffer from upriver hydroelectric dams

UC Riverside – Researchers at UC Riverside and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have found that inland river dams can have highly destructive effects on the stability and productivity of coastline and estuarine habitats. The researchers analyzed downstream ecosystems from four rivers, two dammed and two unobstructed, in the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Nayarit, which Read More…

Salmon growth anomalies explained

The Fish Site – A new study involving the University of Stirling has shed fresh light on the link between the life history of fish, their behaviour and their physical characteristics such as growth rates. The research identified an association between differing growth patterns and body sizes in Atlantic salmon and their behaviour and other developmental characteristics, such as stress Read More…

Watershed moment: Scholar’s studies on lakes worldwide sound…

Illinois State University – As the sun slowly rises across the horizon, heat emanates from the red earth as Catherine O’Reilly makes her way down a path on the outskirts of Kigoma, Tanzania. Schoolchildren run past, dressed in uniforms faded from too many washes and the dust that constantly sweeps through the air. Cresting a hill, O’Reilly sees the sparkling morning light catch the Read More…

Scientists question whether Fish and Game’s massive hatchery salmon…

KBBI – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game says its massive hatchery-wild research study will inform the conversations surrounding the rates at which hatchery pink and chum salmon stray into wild streams and whether they’re less productive than their wild counterparts. The project could have big market and regulatory implications for Alaska’s hatchery industry. Fish and Game Read More…