Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San…

Science Daily – Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches of habitat. A significant portion of that farmland, however, is likely to be retired in the coming decades due to groundwater overdraft, soil salinity, and climate change. A new study led by Read More…

Can robotic ‘sensor fish’ save salmon from hydroelectric dams?

Geek Wire – Some 71 percent of the world’s renewable energy comes from hydropower and more dams are being built all of the time. But while energy wrung from rivers doesn’t release greenhouse gases and contribute to global warming in the way coal and gas plants do, there are still environmental costs. And in the Northwest, the main concern is the harm caused to salmon traveling up Read More…

Study shows black bears need a variety of salmon species to be healthy

The Hamilton Spectator – Black bears need access to different species of salmon rather than huge numbers of a single variety in order to be healthy, a new study by Canadian researchers indicates. Lead author Christina Service said if bears have access to a "portfolio of different salmon species," then the animals have access to more food for a greater part of the year. "It is the Read More…

2018 could be the warmest year on record for oceans: Study

Live Mint – 2018 could be the warmest year on record for oceans, claims a new study, adding the oceans are warming at a much faster rate than expected. India, with its massive coastline of nearly 7,517km is also among the most vulnerable countries to the impact of ocean-warming and rising sea levels. The new research published in Science magazine fuels simmering concerns over the risks of Read More…

Review: A need for weed: why seaweeds are important for healthy…

Functional Ecology – Meadows of fleshy seaweeds are often a prominent part of our tropical coastlines, yet they are often overlooked in favour of coral reefs. Our study explains how seaweeds that form extensive meadows with tall and complex canopies can provide important food and habitat to help sustain healthy tropical seascapes. Tropical seaweed meadows can grow huge canopies each Read More…

High-seas illegal fishing thwarted by catch documentation schemes

Seafood Source – The latest technical paper on catch documentation schemes from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), discusses how such schemes benefit, or could benefit, deep-sea fisheries by protecting them from illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The paper’s author, Giles Hosch, found in his research that catch documentation schemes (CDS) Read More…

The long memory of the Pacific Ocean

Science Daily – The ocean has a long memory. When the water in today's deep Pacific Ocean last saw sunlight, Charlemagne was the Holy Roman Emperor, the Song Dynasty ruled China and Oxford University had just held its very first class. During that time, between the 9th and 12th centuries, the earth's climate was generally warmer before the cold of the Little Ice Age settled in around the 16th Read More…

Giant Singers From Neighboring Oceans Share Song Parts Over Time

WCS – Singing humpback whales from different ocean basins seem to be picking up musical ideas from afar, and incorporating these new phrases and themes into the latest song, according to a newly published study in Royal Society Open Science that’s helping scientists better understand how whales learn and change their musical compositions. The new research shows that two humpback whale Read More…

New salmon-counting technique treats Alaska stream like a crime scene

KTOO – The state of Alaska spends millions of dollars each year counting salmon. Managers need accurate numbers to decide how many fish can be caught, and how many should be allowed to escape upstream to spawn. Much of the counting is done by state employees who watch salmon swim through specially designed stations. But what if you could count the number of fish just by testing for DNA in Read More…

Salt-Water Fish Extinction Seen By 2048

CBS News – The apocalypse has a new date: 2048. That's when the world's oceans will be empty of fish, predicts an international team of ecologists and economists. The cause: the disappearance of species due to overfishing, pollution, habitat loss, and climate change. The study by Boris Worm, PhD, of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, -- with colleagues in the U.K., U.S., Read More…