Small-scale fisheries offer strategies for resilience in the face of…

Science Daily — Coastal communities at the forefront of climate change reveal valuable approaches to foster adaptability and resilience, according to a worldwide analysis of small-scale fisheries by Stanford University researchers. Globally important for both livelihood and nourishment, small-scale fisheries employ about 90 percent of the world's fishers and provide half the fish for Read More…

River connectivity inspires collaborative research efforts

Florida International University — From above, the Amazon River resembles a thick thread sewn into the land. Other rivers and tributaries join with it, forming a great moving tapestry of water that sustains and supports life across South America. Like threads, these rivers form connections between people and places. At the same time, they tell stories and carry memories, histories, sacred Read More…

Ocean acidification causes hearing loss in fish

The Financial — Higher levels of CO2 affect the ability of young snapper to hear, according to a new study published by scientists from the University of Auckland, NIWA and James Cook University in Australia.Humans are releasing more carbon into the atmosphere, resulting in warming of both the atmosphere and oceans. The sea absorbs around 30 per cent of CO2 produced and increasing the amount Read More…

Land use tied to ‘intersex’ smallmouth bass in Bay rivers

Bay Journal — Scientists are still trying to sort out exactly what’s causing sexual abnormalities among smallmouth bass in Chesapeake Bay rivers, but they may be getting closer to figuring out how to reduce them. Prompted initially by disturbing fish kills in the Potomac and Susquehanna rivers, researchers have been on a quest for nearly 20 years to understand what’s impacting the Read More…

When devastation strikes the oceans, sharks can hold the key to…

Florida International University — A world without sharks is a world less resilient to extreme climate events, scientists say. Predators, including some sharks, are known to be critical for maintaining stability and biodiversity in the world’s oceans. But according to a new study, they are also critical in helping ecosystems recover when devastation hits from hurricanes or marine Read More…

Kitchener study links dog waste to change in fish population

Kitchner Today — It's being called the first-ever scientific study on the impact of dog feces on urban fish populations. The study, completed by Kitchener's Biotactic Fisheries Research and Monitoring, has linked the consequence of dog waste on fish survival, weight, and behaviour. Creek Chub from the Grand River were used in the study because of the species’ known tolerance to Read More…

The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say…

EurekAlert! — The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. This new research Read More…

Greenwich Shellfish Commission: Oysters and clams reveal a new…

Greenwich Free Press — Recently the Greenwich Shellfish Commission worked with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Greenwich Cove and Greenwich waters in general. In addition to a 3″ oyster filtering a minimum of 50 gallons of water a day and a three inch clam about 20 gallons, it has now been scientifically demonstrated by NOAA’s research that shellfish also Read More…

Studies find that higher temperatures have an adverse effect on…

PhysOrg — A recent study provides new insights into the effects of rising temperatures on bivalves, a class which includes mussels and oysters. The findings show further evidence of the detrimental impact climate change could have on fisheries and aquaculture worldwide. Mussels exposed to high temperatures can suffer from tissue degradation and increased mortality (Clements et al., 2018), but Read More…

Fishing selects small, shy fish for survival

PhysOrg — Fishing primarily removes larger and more active fish from populations. It thus acts as a selection factor that favors shy fish, as a recent study by the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) shows. The promotion of rather small, shy and overall harder to catch fish has consequences for the quality of the fishery and makes it difficult to accurately Read More…