Some irrigators on West Side of Stanislaus County can expect only 5%…

Modesto Bee — West Side farmers using the federal Central Valley Project can expect 5% to 75% of their contracted supply this year. Two straight dry winters brought that announcement Tuesday from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. It involves water pumped from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to as far south as Kern County. Four irrigation districts totaling about 225,000 acres from Crows Read More…

Evidence suggests climate whiplash may have more extremes in store…

Vanderbilt University — Vanderbilt paleoclimatologists using pioneering research have uncovered evidence of ancient climate “whiplash” in California that exceeded even the extremes the state has weathered in the past decade. Their findings present a long-term picture of what regional climate change may look like in the state that supplies the U.S. with more than a third of its vegetables Read More…

Will the climate crisis tap out the Colorado River?

High Country News — Southern California farmers spend their winters watching the snowpack in the Colorado Rockies, and what they see is the climate crisis hitting hard. When it melts, the snow that falls on these peaks will, eventually, make its way into the Colorado River, which connects the Southwest like a great tendon, tying the Continental Divide in Colorado to Southern California’s Read More…

Red alert sounding on California drought, as Valley gets grim news…

Sacramento Bee — A government agency that controls much of California’s water supply released its initial allocation for 2021, and the numbers reinforced fears that the state is falling into another drought. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said Tuesday that most of the water agencies that rely on the Central Valley Project will get just 5% of their contract supply, a dismally low number. Read More…

Reclamation outlines Central Valley Project initial 2021 water…

Red Bluff Daily News — The Bureau of Reclamation announced Tuesday the initial 2021 water supply allocation for Central Valley Project contractors. Allocation amounts are based on an estimate of water available for delivery to CVP water users and reflects current reservoir storages, precipitation, and snowpack in the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada. This year’s low allocation is an Read More…

California Republican Delegation urges Biden administration to ensure…

The Sentinel — Tuesday, Congressman David G. Valadao and the entire California Republican delegation sent a letter to the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Commerce to emphasize California’s water needs and to express strong support for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s new coordinated long-term operations plan for the Central Valley Project (CVP) and the Read More…

Lack of rain could potentially impact crops in the Central Valley

FOX 26 News — Crops are now blooming here in the San Joaquin Valley, which marks the beginning of harvest season for farmers. As a drier-than-usual wet season continues to unfold, many are worried about how current drought conditions will impact this year’s crop. Ryan Jacobsen is the C.E.O. of the Fresno County Farm Bureau. “It's blooming time here in the San Joaquin Valley, Read More…

California’s Wet Season Hasn’t Brought Much Drought Relief and…

The Weather Channel — California's wet season has not brought much relief so far and the outlook is not promising. The water year, which runs from October through April, started off slowly. October was the second driest on record for California. Later, strong systems – including an atmospheric river in late January that caused flooding, debris flows and feet of snow in the Sierra Read More…

Stanislaus River watershed snow at 53% of average

Manteca/Ripon Bulletin — Despite the atmospheric river that dumped upwards of 80 inches of snow on the highest points of the Stanislaus River watershed last month, the Central Sierra snowpack is just at 53 percent of average for Feb. 18. South San Joaquin Irrigation District General Manager Peter Rietkerk in a memo to the board describes the 2020 water year that started Oct. 1 as being Read More…

Drought-stricken West holds out for more than just dry snow

AP News — It’s a picture-perfect scene — the snow-dusted Sandia Mountains providing a backdrop to the dormant willow and cottonwood trees lining the Rio Grande. While the recent snow has provided a psychological salve to the pains of a persistent drought, it won’t go far in easing the exceptional conditions that have taken hold of New Mexico over the past year. Every square mile of the Read More…