Water plant serving Ceres, Turlock stalls over MID counsel’s fear…

The Modesto Bee – A proposed water plant for Ceres and Turlock faces potentially significant opposition from the Modesto Irrigation District, whose attorney fears potential erosion of water rights because the cities’ environmental studies aren’t up to snuff, the attorney said. General Counsel Ronda Lucas in late April blasted the cities' plan in an official letter on behalf of MID, Read More…

Independent governance eyed for State Water Project

Capitol Weekly – The Legislature created the Department of Water Resources in 1956 for the purpose of managing the State Water Project, then in its early stages of planning. That project now comprises 700 miles of tunnels, pipelines, aqueducts and siphons that transport water from California’s north to its more arid south, serving 26 million people and 750,000 acres of farmland along the Read More…

$2.5 Million Available to Improve Agricultural Water Efficiency in…

PR Newswire – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in California, in partnership with DOI's Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), is providing funds to improve the efficiency of agricultural water use in portions of six water/irrigation districts in California. This partnership combines on-farm conservation enhancements, through NRCS's Read More…

NASA launch to help manage water resources

SBS News – NASA has launched two identical satellites into space from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base with the aim of better managing Earth's water resources. The GRACE-FO mission's satellites - which will orbit the Earth at a height of some 220 kilometres for at least six months - were sent aloft on board a Falcon-9 rocket on Tuesday afternoon after the initial launch last Read More…

Five Things to Know About Water Bonds on Upcoming California Ballots

News Deeply – Californians this year will vote on not one but two water bond measures totaling $13 billion. Given that the state still hasn’t spent all of the $7.5billion from the Proposition 1 water bond passed in 2014, it raises a crucial question: Does California really need another $13 billion in water bonds? As of December 2017, the state had allocated only about $1 billion from Read More…

Innovative Water Storage Projects Aid Wildlife, Salmon and Fishing…

News Deeply – As a result of California’s highly variable climate, the practice of storing water predates statehood. And for more than a century, storage projects in California have generated heated controversy. A century ago, John Muir led a famous and unsuccessful effort to stop the damming of Yosemite’s Hetch Hetchy Valley. Since then, the story of water storage in California has Read More…

Twin satellites circling the globe find California’s losing…

KPCC – Southern California loses the groundwater equivalent of the volume of Lake Mead every 15 years due to drought and farming.  That's 32 gigatons of water, said Jay Famiglietti, senior water scientist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A gigaton is one cubic kilometer of water. That loss matters because groundwater makes up about one-third of our water supply. There is some good news, Read More…

Supply, demand key to balancing valley’s water needs

Western Farm Press – As general manager of a water district that serves about 27,000 agricultural acres in the southern San Joaquin Valley, Eric Averett knows the solutions to the region’s water shortages are fairly straight-forward. He speaks of two knobs that valley water users can turn. One controls supply, and the other  demand. In past years, Averett says he figuratively had Read More…

Water planners work to enhance snowpack data

Ag Alert – Access to precise, real-time data about the amount of water in the Sierra Nevada snowpack has become more critical than ever, California water managers say, in order to assist them in making informed decisions about an ever-less-predictable supply of water. That's why water managers came to a panel discussion about advancements in snow-measurement technology during an Read More…

Facing Climate and Water Pressures, Farmers Return to Age-Old Practice

News Deeply – This spring in California several orchards around Solano and nearby counties sported a new look: lush carpets of mixed grasses growing as tall as 3ft beneath the trees’ bare branches. By summer the scene will change as farmers grow and harvest their nut crops, but the work of the grasses will continue unseen. Cover cropping, an agricultural technique as old as dirt, is Read More…