Dog days of summer snorkel surveys

If you happen to come across this group of oddly dressed individuals floating face down in the river, don’t be alarmed. It’s just our annual summer abundance Read More…

What makes a wetland?

The word "wetland” applies to a variety of different habitats that encompass some combination of land and water. Although there are many definitions, in our work we Read More…

Defining what is essential

On any given day, a number of human activities may alter the environments where protected fish species live. From building a bridge to operating a hydroelectric power Read More…

On the Pacific Flyway

One of the joys of working outdoors in the Central Valley of California is witnessing the biannual migration of waterfowl. Our location is both a rest stop Read More…

The lay of the land

Characterizing habitat types is an important component of environmental science, and many of our projects require understanding a study site’s geography (see On Point, It’s a Wrap!). Read More…

Frogs, toads, and hungry trout

In the late 1800s, most high Sierra Nevada lakes were teeming with frogs and toads, but contained virtually no fish. Over the past century, however, the number Read More…

Surf and turf

Although Americans enjoy heavy doses of both steak and seafood, the two are not necessarily compatible — at least when it comes to cattle grazing near salmon Read More…

In the thick of it

Sometimes the riverine habitat we work in doesn’t even resemble a river – at least not at first glace. A good example is when we sample seasonally Read More…

Picking up pebbles

Sometimes the easiest way to study the bottom of a river is to pick it up, one pebble at a time. Fishes like salmon and trout need Read More…

The rabbit and the coyote brush

Since we are pretty fish-centric people here at FISHBIO, when we think of floodplains we tend to think of Chinook salmon and Sacramento splittail. But a recent Read More…