The salmon survival pyramid

Throughout the watersheds of California’s Central Valley, bright orangey red salmon eggs are hatching into wiggling, yolk-sac-bearing alevin, developing and growing in the safety of river gravel. Read More…

A lamprey by any other name

The Eel River, the third largest watershed in California, drains approximately 3,684 square miles and eventually empties into the Pacific Ocean near Fortuna, California.  Considering the name Read More…

Frogs, toads, and hungry trout

In the late 1800s, most high Sierra Nevada lakes were teeming with frogs and toads, but contained virtually no fish. Over the past century, however, the number Read More…

Trees into charcoal

Hydropower development in rural areas of Laos can change the lives of local people in ways that often are not well studied. Last year, FISHBIO staff in Read More…

Tough choices in dry conditions

In times of extreme conditions, such as the current state of water scarcity in California, some sacrifices and tradeoffs inevitably have to be made. For example, the Read More…

All in or not?

Success for a Chinook salmon is defined as successfully spawning once, then dying – a reproduction strategy known as semelparity. Most do not meet this goal of Read More…

Put to the test

With our staff working on so many projects throughout California and Southeast Asia, it’s rare to get more than a handful of us together in one place Read More…

Extreme drought by the numbers

As a slew of recent headlines suggests, the water supply outlook for the San Joaquin Valley and the rest of California does not look good for 2014. Read More…

A river ran through it

California’s waterways are highly modified with extensive diversions. A special concern when diverting water through various canals and spillways is the entrainment of fishes, which can lead Read More…